connotative


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con·no·ta·tion

 (kŏn′ə-tā′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of connoting.
2.
a. An idea or meaning suggested by or associated with a word or thing: Hollywood holds connotations of romance and glittering success.
b. The set of associations implied by a word in addition to its literal meaning.
3. Logic The set of attributes constituting the meaning of a term; intension.

con′no·ta′tive adj.
con′no·ta′tive·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.connotative - having the power of implying or suggesting something in addition to what is explicit
implicit, inexplicit - implied though not directly expressed; inherent in the nature of something; "an implicit agreement not to raise the subject"; "there was implicit criticism in his voice"; "anger was implicit in the argument"; "the oak is implicit in the acorn"
denotative, denotive - having the power of explicitly denoting or designating or naming

connotative

adjective
Tending to bring a memory, mood, or image, for example, subtly or indirectly to mind:
Translations

connotative

[ˈkɒnəˌteɪtɪv] ADJconnotativo

connotative

adj meaningNeben-, assoziativ, konnotativ (spec)

connotative

[ˈkɒnəˌteɪtɪv] adjconnotativo/a
References in periodicals archive ?
A half century ago, Osgood, Suci, and Tannenbaum (1957) developed an ingenious and versatile method of measuring the connotative meaning of concepts, abstract ideas, and attitudes.
However, we shall also need some definitions because they serve not only to provide clarity about the terminology used in what follows but also because, when unravelled or deconstructed, they offer connotative meanings of the entities to which we shall be paying attention.
For example, the idea of a "priming" word is that it sets into action in the mind of the reader strings of connotative possibilities, some more shared than others, but the "shared" territory is where the action of the poem is.
Miller, addressing homosexual connotation in the visual medium of Alfred Hitchcock's Rope (1948), makes a useful general case for the essentially connotative work of sexual punning, and of innuendo more generally:
Is there some connotative significance to the tunings (i.
The scene seems to be concerned merely with the surface of things, but that surface actually harbors impressive connotative complexity.
However, destiny does not explain the Asante dual connotative meanings.
In addition, Bystydzienska discusses a problem all foreign translations have, the inability to render some English words accurately because of their multivalent connotative values.
Among the connotative codes, Danesi and Perron identify the emotive code as a subcategory of the connotative.
Particularly after Wordsworth--in a stale review of whose most famous prose beauties Poovey locates the advent of a "Romantic Model of Literary value" (285)--Literature prizes connotative over denotative language; it defers reference to any standard of value based in the marketplace; and instead it cultivates an internally-oriented "formal" space of fictive associations, one based on a reading practice of mental tagging and constant cross-reference, the value form of delay, which leads to the demand for rereading that teachers invariably associate with "good" books.
Once the connotative lens is established, McDowell traces the Force through the myriad religions it seemingly resembles.
It is the stress on showing, the connotative element of language that prevails in modernity and in contemporary thought.