connote


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con·note

 (kə-nōt′)
tr.v. con·not·ed, con·not·ing, con·notes
1. To suggest or imply in addition to literal meaning: The word "lion" denotes a kind of wild cat but connotes courage and dignity.
2. To have as a related or attendant condition: For a political leader, hesitation is apt to connote weakness.

[Medieval Latin connotāre, to mark along with : Latin com-, com- + Latin notāre, to mark (from nota, mark; see gnō- in Indo-European roots).]

connote

(kɒˈnəʊt)
vb (tr; often takes a clause as object)
1. (of a word, phrase, etc) to imply or suggest (associations or ideas) other than the literal meaning: the word "maiden" connotes modesty.
2. to involve as a consequence or condition
[C17: from Medieval Latin connotāre, from notāre to mark, make a note, from nota mark, sign, note]

con•note

(kəˈnoʊt)

v.t. -not•ed, -not•ing.
1. to signify or suggest (certain meanings, ideas, etc.) in addition to the explicit or primary meaning: To me, a fireplace connotes comfort and hospitality.
2. to involve as a condition or accompaniment: Injury connotes pain.
[1645–55; < Medieval Latin connotāre= Latin con- con- + notāre to note]

connote


Past participle: connoted
Gerund: connoting

Imperative
connote
connote
Present
I connote
you connote
he/she/it connotes
we connote
you connote
they connote
Preterite
I connoted
you connoted
he/she/it connoted
we connoted
you connoted
they connoted
Present Continuous
I am connoting
you are connoting
he/she/it is connoting
we are connoting
you are connoting
they are connoting
Present Perfect
I have connoted
you have connoted
he/she/it has connoted
we have connoted
you have connoted
they have connoted
Past Continuous
I was connoting
you were connoting
he/she/it was connoting
we were connoting
you were connoting
they were connoting
Past Perfect
I had connoted
you had connoted
he/she/it had connoted
we had connoted
you had connoted
they had connoted
Future
I will connote
you will connote
he/she/it will connote
we will connote
you will connote
they will connote
Future Perfect
I will have connoted
you will have connoted
he/she/it will have connoted
we will have connoted
you will have connoted
they will have connoted
Future Continuous
I will be connoting
you will be connoting
he/she/it will be connoting
we will be connoting
you will be connoting
they will be connoting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been connoting
you have been connoting
he/she/it has been connoting
we have been connoting
you have been connoting
they have been connoting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been connoting
you will have been connoting
he/she/it will have been connoting
we will have been connoting
you will have been connoting
they will have been connoting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been connoting
you had been connoting
he/she/it had been connoting
we had been connoting
you had been connoting
they had been connoting
Conditional
I would connote
you would connote
he/she/it would connote
we would connote
you would connote
they would connote
Past Conditional
I would have connoted
you would have connoted
he/she/it would have connoted
we would have connoted
you would have connoted
they would have connoted
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.connote - express or state indirectly
evince, express, show - give expression to; "She showed her disappointment"
2.connote - involve as a necessary condition of consequence; as in logic; "solving the problem is predicated on understanding it well"
imply - suggest as a logically necessary consequence; in logic

connote

verb imply, suggest, indicate, intimate, signify, hint at, betoken, involve The term 'ladies' connotes females who are simultaneously put on a pedestal and patronised.

connote

verb
To have or convey a particular idea:
Idiom: add up to.
Translations
impliciratikonotiratisugerirati
utal
konotowaćprzywodzić na myślprzywoływaćsugerować
implicasugera
konotiratinamigovati
impliciratisugerisati
innebära

connote

[kɒˈnəʊt] VTconnotar

connote

[kəˈnəʊt] (formal) vt (= suggest, imply) → suggérer

connote

connote

[kɒˈnəʊt] vtconnotare
References in classic literature ?
For 'man,' or 'white' does not express the idea of 'when'; but 'he walks,' or 'he has walked' does connote time, present or past.
Clam was Nelson's partner, and he was a fine, brave, handsome, moustached man of thirty--everything, in short, that his nickname did not connote.
It connotes at once passion, expression, fine criticism, good learning, and a document.
As a poet Coleridge's first great distinction is that which we have already pointed out, namely that he gives wonderfully subtile and appealing expression to the Romantic sense for the strange and the supernatural, and indeed for all that the word 'Romance' connotes at the present day.
19 ( ANI ): The Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) on Monday launched a scathing attack on Congress General Secretary Digvijay Singh after he took on Gujarat Chief Minister Narendra Modi, saying insecurity, hunger and corruption connote in one word, which is the ruling party at the Centre.
Mean is a statistical term, and no one in the lay community uses "mean" to connote average.
It's fourth grade" is supposed to connote some meaning-that the dominant curriculum for fourth grade is misery.
I'm really interested in how buildings, architecture, and ideas of space begin to connote a certain identity of place.
And while the "post-" prefixes may not connote the same sort of denials, we will be directed to a sense of "post-modern" which bears affinities with medieval inquiry.
Almost all astronomers agree that redshift does connote distance.
It ruled that the terms "enjoy" and "enjoyment" as used in various estate tax statutes, "are not terms of art, but connote substantial present economic benefit.
But because the word 'multi' in different ways in our Western languages does not exclude the whole, it can and does in fact connote it, where the context or subject matter suggests or requires it.