conquest


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

con·quest

 (kŏn′kwĕst′, kŏng′-)
n.
1. The act or process of conquering: the Spanish conquest of Mexico; the conquest of an infectious disease; the conquest of shyness.
2. Something, such as territory, acquired by conquering.
3.
a. A person or group whose affection or admiration has been gained: The pianist made a conquest of every audience on the tour.
b. A person who has been seduced by another.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Vulgar Latin *conquaesīta, feminine past participle of *conquaerere, to conquer; see conquer.]

conquest

(ˈkɒnkwɛst; ˈkɒŋ-)
n
1. the act or an instance of conquering or the state of having been conquered; victory
2. a person, thing, etc, that has been conquered or won
3. the act or art of gaining a person's compliance, love, etc, by seduction or force of personality
4. a person, whose compliance, love, etc, has been won over by seduction or force of personality
[C13: from Old French conqueste, from Vulgar Latin conquēsta (unattested), from Latin conquīsīta, feminine past participle of conquīrere to seek out, procure; see conquer]

Conquest

(ˈkɒnkwɛst; ˈkɒŋ-)
n
1. (Historical Terms) the Conquest See Norman Conquest
2. (Historical Terms) the Conquest Canadian the conquest by the United Kingdom of French North America, ending in 1763

con•quest

(ˈkɒn kwɛst, ˈkɒŋ-)

n.
1. the act or process of conquering.
2. the winning of favor, love, etc.
3. a person whose favor, affection, etc., has been won.
4. anything acquired by conquering.
5. the Conquest, Norman Conquest.
[1275–1325; Middle English < Anglo-French, Old French < Vulgar Latin *conquaesita, for Latin conquīsīta]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.conquest - the act of conqueringconquest - the act of conquering    
capture, gaining control, seizure - the act of forcibly dispossessing an owner of property
2.conquest - success in mastering something difficult; "the conquest of space"
success - an attainment that is successful; "his success in the marathon was unexpected"; "his new play was a great success"
3.conquest - an act of winning the love or sexual favor of someone
success - an attainment that is successful; "his success in the marathon was unexpected"; "his new play was a great success"
sexual conquest, score - a seduction culminating in sexual intercourse; "calling his seduction of the girl a `score' was a typical example of male slang"

conquest

noun
1. takeover, coup, acquisition, invasion, occupation, appropriation, annexation, subjugation, subjection He had led the conquest of southern Poland in 1939.
2. defeat, victory, triumph, overthrow, pasting (slang), rout, mastery, vanquishment This hidden treasure charts the brutal Spanish conquest of the Aztecs.
3. seduction people who boast about their sexual conquests
4. catch, prize, supporter, acquisition, follower, admirer, worshipper, adherent, fan, feather in your cap He was a womaniser whose conquests included everyone from prostitutes to princesses.

conquest

noun
The act of conquering:
Translations
فَتْح، غَزْو، اكْتِساب حُب
dobytívítězství
erobring
hódítás
hertaka; ávinningur
dobytie
osvojitev

conquest

[ˈkɒŋkwest] Nconquista f

conquest

[ˈkɒnkwɛst ˈkɒŋkwɛst] n
[country] → conquête f
the conquest of space → la conquête de l'espace
(sexual)conquête f

conquest

nEroberung f; (of enemy etc, disease)Sieg m (→ of über +acc), → Bezwingung f; (inf: = person) → Eroberung f

conquest

[ˈkɒŋkwɛst] nconquista

conquer

(ˈkoŋkə) verb
to overcome or defeat. The Normans conquered England in the eleventh century; You must conquer your fear of the dark.
ˈconqueror noun
conquest (ˈkoŋkwest) noun
(an) act of conquering. The Norman Conquest; He's impressed with you – you've made a conquest.
References in classic literature ?
The new force that had manifested itself in him had, he felt, been at work upon her and had led to her conquest.
If all our reasons for fear, my friend, are confined to such as proceed from supernatural causes, we have but little occasion to be alarmed," continued the undisturbed Cora, "are you certain that our enemies have not invented some new and ingenious method to strike us with terror, that their conquest may become more easy?
When he entered the house, the conquest of his heart was complete.
If moody Ahab was now all quiescence, at least so far as could be known on deck, Stubb, his second mate, flushed with conquest, betrayed an unusual but still good-natured excitement.
The king got his cargo aboard, and then, the talk not turning upon battle, conquest, or iron-clad duel, he dulled down to drowsiness and went off to take a nap.
At breakfast in the morning, the twins' charm of manner and easy and polished bearing made speedy conquest of the family's good graces.
Even this conquest would appear valuable in her eyes.
I abhor every common-place phrase by which wit is intended; and 'setting one's cap at a man,' or 'making a conquest,' are the most odious of all.
Rochester's breast and fell harmless at his feet, might, I knew, if shot by a surer hand, have quivered keen in his proud heart--have called love into his stern eye, and softness into his sardonic face; or, better still, without weapons a silent conquest might have been won.
In the Eastern story, the heavy slab that was to fall on the bed of state in the flush of conquest was slowly wrought out of the quarry, the tunnel for the rope to hold it in its place was slowly carried through the leagues of rock, the slab was slowly raised and fitted in the roof, the rope was rove to it and slowly taken through the miles of hollow to the great iron ring.
and what peace can we return, But to our power hostility and hate, Untam'd reluctance, and revenge though slow, Yet ever plotting how the Conquerour least May reap his conquest, and may least rejoyce In doing what we most in suffering feel?
A circumstance which greatly tended to enhance the tyranny of the nobility, and the sufferings of the inferior classes, arose from the consequences of the Conquest by Duke William of Normandy.