conquest


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con·quest

 (kŏn′kwĕst′, kŏng′-)
n.
1. The act or process of conquering: the Spanish conquest of Mexico; the conquest of an infectious disease; the conquest of shyness.
2. Something, such as territory, acquired by conquering.
3.
a. A person or group whose affection or admiration has been gained: The pianist made a conquest of every audience on the tour.
b. A person who has been seduced by another.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Vulgar Latin *conquaesīta, feminine past participle of *conquaerere, to conquer; see conquer.]

conquest

(ˈkɒnkwɛst; ˈkɒŋ-)
n
1. the act or an instance of conquering or the state of having been conquered; victory
2. a person, thing, etc, that has been conquered or won
3. the act or art of gaining a person's compliance, love, etc, by seduction or force of personality
4. a person, whose compliance, love, etc, has been won over by seduction or force of personality
[C13: from Old French conqueste, from Vulgar Latin conquēsta (unattested), from Latin conquīsīta, feminine past participle of conquīrere to seek out, procure; see conquer]

Conquest

(ˈkɒnkwɛst; ˈkɒŋ-)
n
1. (Historical Terms) the Conquest See Norman Conquest
2. (Historical Terms) the Conquest Canadian the conquest by the United Kingdom of French North America, ending in 1763

con•quest

(ˈkɒn kwɛst, ˈkɒŋ-)

n.
1. the act or process of conquering.
2. the winning of favor, love, etc.
3. a person whose favor, affection, etc., has been won.
4. anything acquired by conquering.
5. the Conquest, Norman Conquest.
[1275–1325; Middle English < Anglo-French, Old French < Vulgar Latin *conquaesita, for Latin conquīsīta]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.conquest - the act of conqueringconquest - the act of conquering    
capture, gaining control, seizure - the act of forcibly dispossessing an owner of property
2.conquest - success in mastering something difficult; "the conquest of space"
success - an attainment that is successful; "his success in the marathon was unexpected"; "his new play was a great success"
3.conquest - an act of winning the love or sexual favor of someone
success - an attainment that is successful; "his success in the marathon was unexpected"; "his new play was a great success"
sexual conquest, score - a seduction culminating in sexual intercourse; "calling his seduction of the girl a `score' was a typical example of male slang"

conquest

noun
1. takeover, coup, acquisition, invasion, occupation, appropriation, annexation, subjugation, subjection He had led the conquest of southern Poland in 1939.
2. defeat, victory, triumph, overthrow, pasting (slang), rout, mastery, vanquishment This hidden treasure charts the brutal Spanish conquest of the Aztecs.
3. seduction people who boast about their sexual conquests
4. catch, prize, supporter, acquisition, follower, admirer, worshipper, adherent, fan, feather in your cap He was a womaniser whose conquests included everyone from prostitutes to princesses.

conquest

noun
The act of conquering:
Translations
فَتْح، غَزْو، اكْتِساب حُب
dobytívítězství
erobring
hódítás
hertaka; ávinningur
dobytie
osvojitev

conquest

[ˈkɒŋkwest] Nconquista f

conquest

[ˈkɒnkwɛst ˈkɒŋkwɛst] n
[country] → conquête f
the conquest of space → la conquête de l'espace
(sexual)conquête f

conquest

nEroberung f; (of enemy etc, disease)Sieg m (→ of über +acc), → Bezwingung f; (inf: = person) → Eroberung f

conquest

[ˈkɒŋkwɛst] nconquista

conquer

(ˈkoŋkə) verb
to overcome or defeat. The Normans conquered England in the eleventh century; You must conquer your fear of the dark.
ˈconqueror noun
conquest (ˈkoŋkwest) noun
(an) act of conquering. The Norman Conquest; He's impressed with you – you've made a conquest.
References in classic literature ?
To heralds and to minstrels, then, leave thy praise, Sir Knight,'' replied Rowena, ``more suiting for their mouths than for thine own; and tell me which of them shall record in song, or in book of tourney, the memorable conquest of this night, a conquest obtained over an old man, followed by a few timid hinds; and its booty, an unfortunate maiden, transported against her will to the castle of a robber?
Beowulf' presents an interesting though very incomplete picture of the life of the upper, warrior, caste among the northern Germanic tribes during their later period of barbarism on the Continent and in England, a life more highly developed than that of the Anglo-Saxons before their conquest of the island.
Well, I should think one conquest would be enough; and too much, unless the subjugation were mutual.
Then the sweeping changes which followed the Norman Conquest wiped out all lesser records than its own.
I abhor every common-place phrase by which wit is intended; and 'setting one's cap at a man,' or 'making a conquest,' are the most odious of all.
Whether or no it was first touched on this occasion we do not learn; but it will be found, in the course of this work, that one of the daughters of the hospitable Comcomly eventually made a conquest of the great eri of the American Fur Company.
We want you to help us in this conquest," he announced, "for we need the mighty aid of the Growleywogs in order to make sure that we shall not be defeated.
Then the bands played their most stirring music while Glinda's army marched into the city, and heralds proclaimed the conquest of the audacious Jinjur and the accession of the beautiful Princess Ozma to the throne of her royal ancestors.
And of the three it was only the English conquest that had lasting effects.
Theresa's passionate, ideal nature demanded an epic life: what were many-volumed romances of chivalry and the social conquests of a brilliant girl to her?
Molly was charmed with the first opportunity she ever had of showing her beauty to advantage; for though she could very well bear to contemplate herself in the glass, even when dressed in rags; and though she had in that dress conquered the heart of Jones, and perhaps of some others; yet she thought the addition of finery would much improve her charms, and extend her conquests.
The disciplined armies always kept on foot on the continent of Europe, though they bear a malignant aspect to liberty and economy, have, notwithstanding, been productive of the signal advantage of rendering sudden conquests impracticable, and of preventing that rapid desolation which used to mark the progress of war prior to their introduction.