conquest

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con·quest

 (kŏn′kwĕst′, kŏng′-)
n.
1. The act or process of conquering: the Spanish conquest of Mexico; the conquest of an infectious disease; the conquest of shyness.
2. Something, such as territory, acquired by conquering.
3.
a. A person or group whose affection or admiration has been gained: The pianist made a conquest of every audience on the tour.
b. A person who has been seduced by another.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Vulgar Latin *conquaesīta, feminine past participle of *conquaerere, to conquer; see conquer.]

conquest

(ˈkɒnkwɛst; ˈkɒŋ-)
n
1. the act or an instance of conquering or the state of having been conquered; victory
2. a person, thing, etc, that has been conquered or won
3. the act or art of gaining a person's compliance, love, etc, by seduction or force of personality
4. a person, whose compliance, love, etc, has been won over by seduction or force of personality
[C13: from Old French conqueste, from Vulgar Latin conquēsta (unattested), from Latin conquīsīta, feminine past participle of conquīrere to seek out, procure; see conquer]

Conquest

(ˈkɒnkwɛst; ˈkɒŋ-)
n
1. (Historical Terms) the Conquest See Norman Conquest
2. (Historical Terms) the Conquest Canadian the conquest by the United Kingdom of French North America, ending in 1763

con•quest

(ˈkɒn kwɛst, ˈkɒŋ-)

n.
1. the act or process of conquering.
2. the winning of favor, love, etc.
3. a person whose favor, affection, etc., has been won.
4. anything acquired by conquering.
5. the Conquest, Norman Conquest.
[1275–1325; Middle English < Anglo-French, Old French < Vulgar Latin *conquaesita, for Latin conquīsīta]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.conquest - the act of conqueringconquest - the act of conquering    
capture, gaining control, seizure - the act of forcibly dispossessing an owner of property
2.conquest - success in mastering something difficult; "the conquest of space"
success - an attainment that is successful; "his success in the marathon was unexpected"; "his new play was a great success"
3.conquest - an act of winning the love or sexual favor of someone
success - an attainment that is successful; "his success in the marathon was unexpected"; "his new play was a great success"
sexual conquest, score - a seduction culminating in sexual intercourse; "calling his seduction of the girl a `score' was a typical example of male slang"

conquest

noun
1. takeover, coup, acquisition, invasion, occupation, appropriation, annexation, subjugation, subjection He had led the conquest of southern Poland in 1939.
2. defeat, victory, triumph, overthrow, pasting (slang), rout, mastery, vanquishment This hidden treasure charts the brutal Spanish conquest of the Aztecs.
3. seduction people who boast about their sexual conquests
4. catch, prize, supporter, acquisition, follower, admirer, worshipper, adherent, fan, feather in your cap He was a womaniser whose conquests included everyone from prostitutes to princesses.

conquest

noun
The act of conquering:
Translations
فَتْح، غَزْو، اكْتِساب حُب
dobytívítězství
erobring
hódítás
hertaka; ávinningur
dobytie
osvojitev

conquest

[ˈkɒŋkwest] Nconquista f

conquest

[ˈkɒnkwɛst ˈkɒŋkwɛst] n
[country] → conquête f
the conquest of space → la conquête de l'espace
(sexual)conquête f

conquest

nEroberung f; (of enemy etc, disease)Sieg m (→ of über +acc), → Bezwingung f; (inf: = person) → Eroberung f

conquest

[ˈkɒŋkwɛst] nconquista

conquer

(ˈkoŋkə) verb
to overcome or defeat. The Normans conquered England in the eleventh century; You must conquer your fear of the dark.
ˈconqueror noun
conquest (ˈkoŋkwest) noun
(an) act of conquering. The Norman Conquest; He's impressed with you – you've made a conquest.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our systems integration experience, together with our geospatial data processing technologies, are perfect complements to ConQuests natural language search engine.
The average number of conquests per year fell drastically - to 0.
The Mongol Conquests also presents evidence to contradict popular beliefs about the Mongols, such as that they used terror as a deliberate strategy or possessed skill at siege warfare.
This produces a rather unsettling similarity to other less ideological-driven conquests.
Written especially for adolescents and teenagers, Alexander The Great Rocks The World chronicles the events of Alexander's life, his military conquests, his ideals of unity, his battle tactics, and much more in detailed yet plain-spoken vernacular language.
In one paragraph he states that archaeological evidence contradicts the Exodus from Egypt, wilderness wanderings and conquests in Transjordan, but then goes on to suppose that there just may have been a miracle worker like Moses among the Semitic slaves in Egypt, who may have mediated to them knowledge about the new deity Yahweh.
Traditionally, the lasting image of Genghis Khan's conquests has been of Mongol ``hordes'' laying waste to civilization.
Throughout the early European conquests, they everywhere met with persecution, but in the twentieth century they came to be eyed with fascination by Western anthropologists, who were engaged by the problems of gender and sexuality that these persons raised.
Cortes later expanded his conquests into Central America.
Roland Greene's subtle and complex Unrequited Conquests examines an instance of what Jameson terms an "ideology of form": the peculiar aptness of (Petrarchan) lyric for representing the fateful encounters between European "discoverers" and the worlds/peoples they "discovered.
In the April 13 NATURE, Madeleine Beekman, now at the University of Sheffield in England, and her colleagues at Wageningen Agricultural University in the Netherlands give the first detailed account of Cape conquests in experimental hives of European bees.
Addressing the impact of conquest on the water dispute can be achieved by incorporating into the equitable utilization analysis the notion of compensation for the Palestinian water losses resulting from Israeli conquests.