conscience clause


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conscience clause

n.
A clause in a law that relieves persons whose conscientious or religious scruples forbid compliance.

conscience clause

n
(Law) a clause in a law or contract exempting persons with moral scruples
References in periodicals archive ?
During Assembly Question Time, Mrs Cochrane asked DUP Economy Minister Arlene Foster: "Does the minister share my concern that the proposed conscience clause could have implications similar to the business and sport boycott of the state of Indiana following the introduction of similar legislation?
Today's conscience clause on abortion will give way to tomorrow's discrimination against gay employees--or any other aspect of an employee's personal life a boss might disagree with.
But as a result of campaigning by the No Conscription Fellowship, a conscience clause was written into the Act whereby people could refuse to fight on religious or moral grounds.
In 1915, Barlow led members of the No-Conscription Fellowship to successfully secure the conscience clause, which enshrined the right to claim exemption from military service in the 1916 Military Service Act.
The mandate does not include a conscience clause for employers who object to such coverage on moral grounds.
Lord Hunt told the committee he wanted the new body to be able to "dictate the prominence" of apologies printed in newspapers, and said he supported the idea of a whistleblowing hotline and a conscience clause in journalist's contracts.
The only conscience clause that ever came into play came in the spring of 2012 as an unacceptable exemption from the HHS Mandate Obama had just imposed on the nation.
Such an arrangement is illogical and unwise, and must be remedied by limiting conscience clause protection to individuals.
It also makes permanent the Hyde-Weldon conscience clause protecting health care workers who object to being forced by the government to participate in abortion.
Accommodation can be as simple as implementing a conscience clause at work to allow the religious objector to opt out and be excused.
Not to worry, says Levine; his bill includes a conscience clause, ensuring that no medical professionals would have to do anything they consider morally abhorrent.