conscience clause


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conscience clause

n.
A clause in a law that relieves persons whose conscientious or religious scruples forbid compliance.

conscience clause

n
(Law) a clause in a law or contract exempting persons with moral scruples
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The general pharmaceutical Council, the body which regulates the British pharmaceutical industry's professional standards, has decided to retain its conscience clause allowing for pharmacists to refer patients to other professionals if they feel they cannot provide certain medications in good conscience.
Hiltz challenged their claim that the resolution, which contains a conscience clause, "does not provide adequate protection for the consciences of dioceses, clergy and congregations.
The proposal would allow delegates bound to vote for Trump at the party's nominating convention next month to withdraw their support by employing a so-called conscience clause.
The discussion on the possibilities as well as the purposefulness of restricting medical conscience clause has been ongoing for quite a long time in Europe, the United States, Canada, Australia as well as other states of law.
During Assembly Question Time, Mrs Cochrane asked DUP Economy Minister Arlene Foster: "Does the minister share my concern that the proposed conscience clause could have implications similar to the business and sport boycott of the state of Indiana following the introduction of similar legislation?
But as a result of campaigning by the No Conscription Fellowship, a conscience clause was written into the Act whereby people could refuse to fight on religious or moral grounds.
In 1915, Barlow led members of the No-Conscription Fellowship to successfully secure the conscience clause, which enshrined the right to claim exemption from military service in the 1916 Military Service Act.
The mandate does not include a conscience clause for employers who object to such coverage on moral grounds.
Pharmacy Law and Ethics: Ancient Times to Conscience Clause
Lord Hunt told the committee he wanted the new body to be able to "dictate the prominence" of apologies printed in newspapers, and said he supported the idea of a whistleblowing hotline and a conscience clause in journalist's contracts.