conserve


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Related to conserve: converse

con·serve

 (kən-sûrv′)
v. con·served, con·serv·ing, con·serves
v.tr.
1.
a. To protect from loss or harm; preserve: calls to conserve our national heritage in the face of bewildering change.
b. To use carefully or sparingly, avoiding waste: kept the thermostat lower to conserve energy.
2. To keep (a quantity) constant through physical or chemical reactions or evolutionary changes.
3. To preserve (fruits) with sugar.
v.intr.
To economize: tried to conserve on fuel during the long winter.
n. (kŏn′sûrv′)
A jam made of fruits stewed in sugar.

[Middle English conserven, from Old French conserver, from Latin cōnservāre : com-, intensive pref.; see com- + servāre, to preserve; see ser- in Indo-European roots.]

con·serv′a·ble adj.
con·serv′er n.

conserve

vb (tr)
1. to keep or protect from harm, decay, loss, etc
2. (Cookery) to preserve (a foodstuff, esp fruit) with sugar
n
(Cookery) a preparation of fruit in sugar, similar to jam but usually containing whole pieces of fruit
[(vb) C14: from Latin conservāre to keep safe, from servāre to save, protect; (n) C14: from Medieval Latin conserva, from Latin conservāre]
conˈservable adj
conˈserver n

con•serve

(v. kənˈsɜrv; n. ˈkɒn sɜrv, kənˈsɜrv)

v. -served, -serv•ing,
n. v.t.
1. to prevent injury, decay, waste, or loss of: Conserve your strength.
2. to use or manage (natural resources) wisely; preserve; save.
3. to hold (a physical or chemical property) constant during a process.
4. to preserve (fruit) by cooking with sugar or syrup.
n.
5. a mixture of fruits cooked with sugar to a jamlike consistency.
[1325–75; Middle English < Latin conservāre to save, preserve <con- con- + servāre to guard]
con•serv′a•ble, adj.
con•serv′er, n.

conserve


Past participle: conserved
Gerund: conserving

Imperative
conserve
conserve
Present
I conserve
you conserve
he/she/it conserves
we conserve
you conserve
they conserve
Preterite
I conserved
you conserved
he/she/it conserved
we conserved
you conserved
they conserved
Present Continuous
I am conserving
you are conserving
he/she/it is conserving
we are conserving
you are conserving
they are conserving
Present Perfect
I have conserved
you have conserved
he/she/it has conserved
we have conserved
you have conserved
they have conserved
Past Continuous
I was conserving
you were conserving
he/she/it was conserving
we were conserving
you were conserving
they were conserving
Past Perfect
I had conserved
you had conserved
he/she/it had conserved
we had conserved
you had conserved
they had conserved
Future
I will conserve
you will conserve
he/she/it will conserve
we will conserve
you will conserve
they will conserve
Future Perfect
I will have conserved
you will have conserved
he/she/it will have conserved
we will have conserved
you will have conserved
they will have conserved
Future Continuous
I will be conserving
you will be conserving
he/she/it will be conserving
we will be conserving
you will be conserving
they will be conserving
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been conserving
you have been conserving
he/she/it has been conserving
we have been conserving
you have been conserving
they have been conserving
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been conserving
you will have been conserving
he/she/it will have been conserving
we will have been conserving
you will have been conserving
they will have been conserving
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been conserving
you had been conserving
he/she/it had been conserving
we had been conserving
you had been conserving
they had been conserving
Conditional
I would conserve
you would conserve
he/she/it would conserve
we would conserve
you would conserve
they would conserve
Past Conditional
I would have conserved
you would have conserved
he/she/it would have conserved
we would have conserved
you would have conserved
they would have conserved
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.conserve - fruit preserved by cooking with sugarconserve - fruit preserved by cooking with sugar
confiture - preserved or candied fruit
apple butter - thick dark spicy puree of apples
chowchow - a Chinese preserve of mixed fruits and ginger
jam - preserve of crushed fruit
lemon cheese, lemon curd - a conserve with a thick consistency; made with lemons and butter and eggs and sugar
jelly - a preserve made of the jelled juice of fruit
marmalade - a preserve made of the pulp and rind of citrus fruits
Verb1.conserve - keep constant through physical or chemical reactions or evolutionary change; "Energy is conserved in this process"
hold, keep, maintain - keep in a certain state, position, or activity; e.g., "keep clean"; "hold in place"; "She always held herself as a lady"; "The students keep me on my toes"
2.conserve - keep in safety and protect from harm, decay, loss, or destructionconserve - keep in safety and protect from harm, decay, loss, or destruction; "We preserve these archeological findings"; "The old lady could not keep up the building"; "children must be taught to conserve our national heritage"; "The museum curator conserved the ancient manuscripts"
keep - look after; be the keeper of; have charge of; "He keeps the shop when I am gone"
embalm - preserve a dead body
plastinate - preserve (tissue) with plastics, as for teaching and research purposes; "The doctor plastinates bodies to teach anatomy to his students"
hold the line - hold the line on prices; keep the price of something constant
3.conserve - use cautiously and frugally; "I try to economize my spare time"; "conserve your energy for the ascent to the summit"
save, preserve - to keep up and reserve for personal or special use; "She saved the old family photographs in a drawer"
retrench - tighten one's belt; use resources carefully
squander, waste, blow - spend thoughtlessly; throw away; "He wasted his inheritance on his insincere friends"; "You squandered the opportunity to get and advanced degree"
4.conserve - preserve with sugar; "Mom always conserved the strawberries we grew in the backyard"
cookery, cooking, preparation - the act of preparing something (as food) by the application of heat; "cooking can be a great art"; "people are needed who have experience in cookery"; "he left the preparation of meals to his wife"
preserve, keep - prevent (food) from rotting; "preserved meats"; "keep potatoes fresh"

conserve

verb
1. save, husband, take care of, hoard, store up, go easy on, use sparingly The factory has closed over the weekend to conserve energy.
save spend, blow (slang), waste, misuse, squander, use up, dissipate, fritter away, misspend, be extravagant with, spend like water
2. protect, keep, save, preserve an increase in US aid to help developing countries conserve their forests

conserve

verb
1. To protect (an asset) from loss or destruction:
2. To use without wasting:
3. To prepare (food) for storage and future use:
Translations
مُرَبَّيات، أثمار مَطْبوخَة بِالسُّكَّريُحافِظ عَلى
uchovatudržovatzachovatzavařenina
bevarehenkogt frugtsyltetøj
niîursoînir ávextirvarîveita
apsaugagamtosaugininkasišlaikymasišlaikymo šalininkasišsaugoti
konservētkonservisaglabāt
korumakreçel/meyve konservesi

conserve

[kənˈsɜːv]
A. VT [+ natural resources, environment, historic buildings] → conservar, preservar; [+ moisture] → conservar; [+ energy, water] → ahorrar, conservar
to conserve one's energiesahorrar (las) energías
B. Nconserva f

conserve

[kənˈsɜːrv]
vt
[+ supplies, energy, natural resources] → économiser; [+ batteries] → conserver, préserver
(= one's strength, one's energy) → économiser, ménager
n [ˈkɒnsɜːrv]confiture f, conserve f (de fruits)

conserve

vterhalten, bewahren, konservieren; buildingerhalten; one’s strengthschonen; strength, energy(auf)sparen

conserve

[kənˈsɜːv]
1. vtconservare
to conserve one's strength → risparmiare le forze
2. nconserva di frutta

conserve

(kənˈsəːv) verb
to keep from changing, being damaged or lost. We must conserve the country's natural resources; This old building should be conserved.
noun
something preserved, eg fruits in sugar, jam etc.
ˌconserˈvation (kon-) noun
the act of conserving especially wildlife, the countryside, old buildings etc.
ˌconserˈvationist (kon-) noun
a person who is interested in conservation.
conˈservatism (-vətizəm) noun
dislike of change.
conˈservative (-tiv) adjective
1. disliking change. Older people tend to be conservative in their attitudes; conservative opinions.
2. in politics, wanting to avoid major changes and to keep business and industry in private hands.

con·serve

v. conservar, mantener.

conserve

vt conservar
References in classic literature ?
But what I am of opinion the governor should cat now in order to preserve and fortify his health is a hundred or so of wafer cakes and a few thin slices of conserve of quinces, which will settle his stomach and help his digestion.
A little curry is good, and a fried cake, and a morsel of conserve would please him, I think.
But she filled it, none the less, with good, steaming vegetable curry, clapped a fried cake atop, and a morsel of clarified butter on the cake, dabbed a lump of sour tamarind conserve at the side; and Kim looked at the load lovingly.
At the same time I stepped from behind my boul-der, drawing one of my revolvers that I might conserve the more precious ammunition of the express rifle.
Bertha Kircher, finding her struggles futile and realizing that she must conserve her strength for some chance opportunity of escape, desisted from her efforts to break from the grasp of Prince Metak as the fellow fled with her through the dimly lighted corridors of the palace.
The Swede insisted upon carrying the child while they travelled, and in countless other ways did what he could to help Jane Clayton conserve her strength.
If serving a sentence the number of games he must play is also indicated, and thus the one directing the moves knows which pieces to risk and which to conserve, and further than this, a man's chances are affected by the position that is assigned him for the game.
Olson, Whitely, and Wilson each wished to accompany me; but I told them that they were needed here, since with Bradley's party still absent and the Germans gone it was necessary that we conserve our force as far as might be possible.
What they are after is land of their own, which they will love and care for and conserve.
He was a young man of much mental activity, and, above all, gifted with a spirit of contrivance; but then, his faculties would not tell with great effect in any other medium than that of candied sugars, conserves, and pastry.
The Conserve Valet smart charging station is a convenient place to charge all of your mobile devices, and it also helps save energy by shutting off automatically when the devices are fully charged.
The city will spend about $3,000 on ads urging residents to turn down the thermostat and conserve whenever possible.