constancy


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con·stan·cy

 (kŏn′stən-sē)
n.
1. Steadfastness, as in purpose or affection; faithfulness.
2. The condition or quality of being constant; changelessness.

constancy

(ˈkɒnstənsɪ)
n
1. the quality of having a resolute mind, purpose, or affection; steadfastness
2. freedom from change or variation; stability
3. (Psychology) psychol the perceptual phenomenon in which attributes of an object appear to remain the same in a variety of different presentations, e.g., a given object looks roughly the same size regardless of its distance from the observer
4. (Environmental Science) ecology the frequency of occurrence of a particular species in sample plots from a plant community

con•stan•cy

(ˈkɒn stən si)

n.
1. the quality of being unchanging or unwavering, as in purpose, love, or loyalty.
2. uniformity or regularity, as in qualities or conditions; stability.
[1520–30; < Latin]

Constancy

 

dyed-in-the-wool Confirmed, inveterate; complete, thorough, unmitigated, out-and-out. When wool is dyed before being made into yarn, its color is more firmly fixed and lasting. A variant of this expression appeared in Sir Thomas North’s translation of Plutarch’s Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romans (1579):

He had … through institution and education (as it were) died in wool the manners of children.

hard-and-fast Ironclad, binding, strict, rigid, unbending. The literal, nautical sense of the term denotes a ship on shore or aground, stuck and immovable. It is probably this sense that gave rise to the figurative meaning in popular use today. Both the figurative and literal meanings date from the late 19th century.

man for all seasons A reliable, steadfast male; a man of principle who retains his integrity regardless of the situation. This expression alludes to a man who is unruffled by vicissitudes and who remains constant despite changing circumstances, like the weather. The phrase was popularized when Robert Bolt used it as the title of his dramatization of the life of Sir Thomas More (1960).

regular brick An agreeable, sincere male; a regular guy. This expression, referring to the solid, unvariegated constitution of a brick, describes a man who is genuinely amiable, unaffected, and reliable.

I don’t stick to declare Father Dick … was a regular brick. (Richard H. Barham, The Ingoldsby Legends, 1845)

through thick and thin Through difficulties or adversity, in spite of any or all obstacles; faithfully, unwaveringly. According to the OED, thick and thin was originally thicket and thin wood. Thus this expression denoted an actual physical obstacle, as in the following quotation from Spenser’s Faerie Queene:

His tireling jade he fiercely forth did push Through thick and thin, both over bank and bush.

Currently through thick and thin is used figuratively as well, referring to any conceivable obstacle, and in context, connoting faithfulness.

There’s five hundred men here to back you up through thick and thin. (T. H. Hall Caine, The Manxman, 1894)

true-blue Loyal, faithful; steadfast, staunch, unwavering, constant.

The Old Beau is true-blue, to the high-flown principles [of] King Edward’s First Protestant Church. (Edmund Hickeringill, Priest-craft, 1705)

The color blue has long been the symbol of truth and constancy. Some conjecture the association arose because of the renowned fastness of Coventry blue dye. According to the OED, true-blue was applied to the Scottish Presbyterian or Whig party of the 17th century, the Covenanters having assumed blue as their partisan color in opposition to the royal red. Their doing so may have been connected with Numbers 15:38 of the Bible, in which the Lord commands Moses to have the Israelites put a blue ribbon on the fringes of the borders of their garments as a reminder to keep His commandments.

ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.constancy - the quality of being enduring and free from change or variation; "early mariners relied on the constancy of the trade winds"
unchangeability, unchangeableness, unchangingness, changelessness - the quality of being unchangeable; having a marked tendency to remain unchanged
invariance - the nature of a quantity or property or function that remains unchanged when a given transformation is applied to it; "the invariance of the configuration under translation"
metastability - the quality of a physical system that persists in its existing equilibrium when undisturbed (or only slightly disturbed) but able to pass to a more stable equilibrium when sufficiently disturbed
monotony - constancy of tone or pitch or inflection
changefulness, inconstancy - the quality of being changeable and variable
2.constancy - (psychology) the tendency for perceived objects to give rise to very similar perceptual experiences in spite of wide variations in the conditions of observation
perception - the process of perceiving
brightness constancy - the tendency for a visual object to be perceived as having the same brightness under widely different conditions of illumination
color constancy, colour constancy - the tendency for a color to look the same under widely different viewing conditions
shape constancy - the tendency to perceive the shape of a rigid object as constant despite differences in the viewing angle (and consequent differences in the shape of the pattern projected on the retina of the eye)
size constancy - the tendency to perceive the veridical size of a familiar object despite differences in their distance (and consequent differences in the size of the pattern projected on the retina of the eye)
psychological science, psychology - the science of mental life
3.constancy - faithfulness and dependability in personal attachments (especially sexual fidelity)
faithfulness, fidelity - the quality of being faithful

constancy

noun
1. steadiness, stability, regularity, uniformity, perseverance, firmness, permanence, fixedness Climate reflects a basic struggle between constancy and change.
2. faithfulness, loyalty, devotion, fidelity, dependability, trustworthiness, steadfastness Even before they were married, she had worried about his constancy.
Quotations
"But I am constant as the northern star"
"Of whose true-fixed and resting quality"
"There is no fellow in the firmament" [William Shakespeare Julius Caesar]

constancy

noun
Faithfulness or devotion to a person, a cause, obligations, or duties:
Translations
ثَبات، إخْلاص
stálost
bestandighedstandhaftighed
állandóság
stöîugleiki
stálosť
içten bağlılıksüreklilik

constancy

[ˈkɒnstənsɪ] N
1. (= regularity) [of temperature etc] → constancia f
2. (= faithfulness) → fidelidad f

constancy

[ˈkɒnstənsi] n
(= unchanging quality) → constance f
(= fidelity) [person] → fidélité f

constancy

n
(of support, supporter)Beständigkeit f, → Konstanz f (liter); (of feelings)Unveränderlichkeit f, → Unwandelbarkeit f; (of friend, lover)Treue f; (also constancy of purpose)Ausdauer f
(of temperature etc)Beständigkeit f

constancy

[ˈkɒnstnsɪ] n (of friend, affection) → costanza

constant

(ˈkonstənt) adjective
1. never stopping. a constant noise.
2. unchanging. It must be kept at a constant temperature.
3. faithful. He remained constant.
ˈconstantly adverb
ˈconstancy noun
References in classic literature ?
They knew not each other's opinion, either its constancy or its change, on the one leading point of Anne's conduct, for the subject was never alluded to; but Anne, at seven-and-twenty, thought very differently from what she had been made to think at nineteen.
Silly woman to expect constancy from so charming a man
This loss, however great, he bore like a man of sense and constancy, though it must be confest he would often talk a little whimsically on this head; for he sometimes said he looked on himself as still married, and considered his wife as only gone a little before him, a journey which he should most certainly, sooner or later, take after her; and that he had not the least doubt of meeting her again in a place where he should never part with her more--sentiments for which his sense was arraigned by one part of his neighbours, his religion by a second, and his sincerity by a third.
And I do not know that I should be fond of preaching often; now and then, perhaps once or twice in the spring, after being anxiously expected for half a dozen Sundays together; but not for a constancy; it would not do for a constancy.
Beyond a line or two, to say that I was well, and had arrived at such a place, I had not had fortitude or constancy to write a letter since I left home.
7) In which army is there the greater constancy both in reward and punishment?
Many were converted after the battle, and when they had embraced the Catholic faith, adhered to that with the same constancy and firmness with which they had before persisted in their errors.
And for the inspiration of this high constancy they were indebted to Lord Nelson alone.
The duteous merciful constancy of his wife had delivered him from one dread, but it could not hinder her presence from being still a tribunal before which he shrank from confession and desired advocacy.
Thither,'' said Rowena, ``do I =not= go; and I pray you to beware, lest what you mean for courage and constancy, shall be accounted hardness of heart.
Thou hast thy wife at thy feet, and she whom thou wouldst have for thy wife is in the arms of her husband: reflect whether it will be right for thee, whether it will be possible for thee to undo what Heaven has done, or whether it will be becoming in thee to seek to raise her to be thy mate who in spite of every obstacle, and strong in her truth and constancy, is before thine eyes, bathing with the tears of love the face and bosom of her lawful husband.
This is in the supposition of his attachment continuing what it now is; but I do not know that I expect it will; I do not look upon him to be quite the sort of man I do not altogether build upon his steadiness or constancy.