constellation


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con·stel·la·tion

 (kŏn′stə-lā′shən)
n.
1. Astronomy
a. A grouping of stars on the celestial sphere perceived as a figure or design, especially one of the 88 recognized groups named after characters from classical Greek and Roman mythology as well as various common animals and objects.
b. An area of the celestial sphere occupied by one of the 88 recognized constellations.
2. The configuration of planets at the time of one's birth, regarded by astrologers as determining one's character or fate.
3. A gathering or assemblage, especially of prominent persons or things: The symposium was attended by a constellation of artists and writers.
4. A set or configuration, as of related items, properties, ideas, or individuals: a constellation of demands ranging from better food to improved health care; a constellation of feelings about the divorce.

[Middle English constellacioun, from Old French constellation, from Late Latin cōnstēllātiō, cōnstēllātiōn- : Latin com-, com- + Latin stēlla, star; see ster- in Indo-European roots.]

con·stel′la·to′ry (-stĕl′ə-tôr′ē) adj.

constellation

(ˌkɒnstɪˈleɪʃən)
n
1. (Astronomy)
a. any of the 88 groups of stars as seen from the earth and the solar system, many of which were named by the ancient Greeks after animals, objects, or mythological persons
b. an area on the celestial sphere containing such a group
2. a gathering of brilliant or famous people or things
3. (Psychoanalysis) psychoanal a group of ideas felt to be related
[C14: from Late Latin constellātiō, from Latin com- together + stella star]
ˌconstelˈlational adj
constellatory adj

con•stel•la•tion

(ˌkɒn stəˈleɪ ʃən)

n.
1.
a. any of various named groups of stars, as Ursa Major, Boötes, or Orion.
b. the section of the heavens occupied by such a group.
2. the astrological grouping of the heavenly bodies, esp. at a person's birth.
3. a group of ideas, qualities, etc., related in some way.
4. any brilliant, outstanding group or assemblage: a constellation of great writers.
[1275–1325; < Anglo-French < Late Latin constellātiō position of the stars at a person's birth or conception]
con•stel•la•to•ry (kənˈstɛl əˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i) adj.
click for a larger image
constellation
Diagram of the constellation Orion. Betelgeuse, the large, reddish star, is the coolest star in the constellation; Rigel, the large, bluish-white star, is the hottest. Orion's belt can be seen in the middle of the figure.

con·stel·la·tion

(kŏn′stə-lā′shən)
1. A group of stars seen as forming a figure or design in the sky, especially one of 88 recognized groups.
2. An area of the celestial sphere occupied by one of the 88 recognized constellations.

constellation

A number of like satellites that are part of a system. Satellites in a constellation generally have a similar orbit. For example, the Global Positioning System constellation consists of 24 satellites distributed in six orbital planes with similar eccentricities, altitudes, and inclinations. See also global positioning system.

Constellation

 a fixed group of stars; an assembly of great splendour; a group of famous people; a fixed pattern of individual elements functioning in a related way.
Examples: constellation of fair ladies, 1665; of genius; of computer programs; of prophets, 1860; of stars; of wax lights, 1739.

constellation

An apparent grouping of prominent stars. Stars have been divided into the artificial groups called constellations for over 2000 years.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.constellation - an arrangement of parts or elementsconstellation - an arrangement of parts or elements; "the outcome depends on the configuration of influences at the time"
design, plan - an arrangement scheme; "the awkward design of the keyboard made operation difficult"; "it was an excellent design for living"; "a plan for seating guests"
redundancy - (electronics) a system design that duplicates components to provide alternatives in case one component fails
network topology, topology - the configuration of a communication network
chunking, unitisation, unitization - (psychology) the configuration of smaller units of information into large coordinated units
2.constellation - a configuration of stars as seen from the earth
natural object - an object occurring naturally; not made by man
asterism - (astronomy) a cluster of stars (or a small constellation)
star - (astronomy) a celestial body of hot gases that radiates energy derived from thermonuclear reactions in the interior
Translations
مَجْموعَة نُجوم، كَوكَبَه
souhvězdí
stjernebillede
tähtkuju
tähdistötähtikuvio
konstalacijasazvijēžđezviježđe
csillagzat
stjörnusamstæîa; stjörnumerki
žvaigždynas
zvaigznājs
súhvezdie
burçtakım yıldız

constellation

[ˌkɒnstəˈleɪʃən] Nconstelación f

constellation

[ˌkɒnstəˈleɪʃən] nconstellation f

constellation

nSternbild nt, → Konstellation f (also fig)

constellation

[ˌkɒnstəˈleɪʃn] ncostellazione f

constellation

(konstəˈleiʃən) noun
a named group of stars. The Plough and Orion are constellations.
References in classic literature ?
Stubb longed for vermillion stars to be painted upon the blade of his every oar; screwing each oar in his big vice of wood, the carpenter symmetrically supplies the constellation.
One thinks Heidelberg by day--with its surroundings-- is the last possibility of the beautiful; but when he sees Heidelberg by night, a fallen Milky Way, with that glittering railway constellation pinned to the border, he requires time to consider upon the verdict.
Its seven letters seemed to hang right across the clouds like the Seven Stars, an apocalyptic constellation, a veritable sky sign; and again the name was an angel standing with a silver trumpet, and again it was a song.
I admired the strength, comeliness, and speed of the inhabitants; and such a constellation of virtues, in such amiable persons, produced in me the highest veneration.
What a constellation of attractions to centre in one man
Tess's face and neck reflected the same warmth, which each gem turned into an Aldebaran or a Sirius--a constellation of white, red, and green flashes, that interchanged their hues with her every pulsation.
Guillemard was still in her place, but she really was the only lady, and dressed as quietly as I had prophesied; round her neck was her rope of pearls, but not the glimmer of an emerald nor the glint of a diamond, nor yet the flashing constellation of a tiara in her hair.
We want the great genius only for joy; for one star more in our constellation, for one tree more in our grove.
Back it came, with the editor's regrets, and Martin sent it to San Francisco again, this time to THE HORNET, a pretentious monthly that had been fanned into a constellation of the first magnitude by the brilliant journalist who founded it.
She passed over the constellation of the Twins, and was now nearing the halfway point between the horizon and the zenith.
We are wont to imagine rare and delectable places in some remote and more celestial corner of the system, behind the constellation of Cassiopeia's Chair, far from noise and disturbance.
For some time they remained fixed and unwavering--a constellation of fierce stars in the jungle night--then the male lion advanced slowly toward the boma, where all but a single black still crouched in trembling terror.