constitute


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con·sti·tute

 (kŏn′stĭ-to͞ot′, -tyo͞ot′)
tr.v. con·sti·tut·ed, con·sti·tut·ing, con·sti·tutes
1.
a. To be the elements or parts of; compose: Copper and tin constitute bronze.
b. To amount to; equal: "Rabies is transmitted through a bite; ... patting a rabid animal in itself does not constitute exposure" (Malcolm W. Browne).
2.
a. To set up or establish according to law or provision: a body that is duly constituted under the charter.
b. To found (an institution, for example).
c. To enact (a law or regulation).
3. To appoint to an office, dignity, function, or task; designate.

[Middle English constituten, from Latin cōnstituere, cōnstitūt-, to set up : com-, com- + statuere, to set up; see stā- in Indo-European roots.]

con′sti·tut′er, con′sti·tu′tor n.

constitute

(ˈkɒnstɪˌtjuːt)
vb (tr)
1. to make up; form; compose: the people who constitute a jury.
2. to appoint to an office or function: a legally constituted officer.
3. to set up (a school or other institution) formally; found
4. (Law) law to give legal form to (a court, assembly, etc)
5. (Law) law obsolete to set up or enact (a law)
[C15: from Latin constituere, from com- (intensive) + statuere to place]
ˈconstiˌtuter, ˈconstiˌtutor n

con•sti•tute

(ˈkɒn stɪˌtut, -ˌtyut)

v.t. -tut•ed, -tut•ing.
1. to compose; form: mortar constituted of lime and sand.
2. to appoint to an office or function: He was constituted treasurer.
3. to establish, as a law.
4. to give legal form to.
5. to create or be tantamount to: Imports constitute a challenge to local goods.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin constitūtus, past participle of constituere; see constituent]

constitute

, constitution - Constitute can mean "make laws" and a constitution is a "how-to" document for a government or organization.
See also related terms for laws.

constitute

To provide the legal authority for the existence of a new unit of the Armed Services. The new unit is designated and listed, but it has no specific existence until it is activated. See also commission.

constitute


Past participle: constituted
Gerund: constituting

Imperative
constitute
constitute
Present
I constitute
you constitute
he/she/it constitutes
we constitute
you constitute
they constitute
Preterite
I constituted
you constituted
he/she/it constituted
we constituted
you constituted
they constituted
Present Continuous
I am constituting
you are constituting
he/she/it is constituting
we are constituting
you are constituting
they are constituting
Present Perfect
I have constituted
you have constituted
he/she/it has constituted
we have constituted
you have constituted
they have constituted
Past Continuous
I was constituting
you were constituting
he/she/it was constituting
we were constituting
you were constituting
they were constituting
Past Perfect
I had constituted
you had constituted
he/she/it had constituted
we had constituted
you had constituted
they had constituted
Future
I will constitute
you will constitute
he/she/it will constitute
we will constitute
you will constitute
they will constitute
Future Perfect
I will have constituted
you will have constituted
he/she/it will have constituted
we will have constituted
you will have constituted
they will have constituted
Future Continuous
I will be constituting
you will be constituting
he/she/it will be constituting
we will be constituting
you will be constituting
they will be constituting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been constituting
you have been constituting
he/she/it has been constituting
we have been constituting
you have been constituting
they have been constituting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been constituting
you will have been constituting
he/she/it will have been constituting
we will have been constituting
you will have been constituting
they will have been constituting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been constituting
you had been constituting
he/she/it had been constituting
we had been constituting
you had been constituting
they had been constituting
Conditional
I would constitute
you would constitute
he/she/it would constitute
we would constitute
you would constitute
they would constitute
Past Conditional
I would have constituted
you would have constituted
he/she/it would have constituted
we would have constituted
you would have constituted
they would have constituted
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.constitute - form or compose; "This money is my only income"; "The stone wall was the backdrop for the performance"; "These constitute my entire belonging"; "The children made up the chorus"; "This sum represents my entire income for a year"; "These few men comprise his entire army"
make - constitute the essence of; "Clothes make the man"
compose - form the substance of; "Greed and ambition composed his personality"
form, constitute, make - to compose or represent:"This wall forms the background of the stage setting"; "The branches made a roof"; "This makes a fine introduction"
straddle, range - range or extend over; occupy a certain area; "The plants straddle the entire state"
fall into, fall under - be included in or classified as; "This falls under the rubric 'various'"
pose, present - introduce; "This poses an interesting question"
supplement - serve as a supplement to; "Vitamins supplemented his meager diet"
2.constitute - create and charge with a task or function; "nominate a committee"
institute, establish, found, plant, constitute - set up or lay the groundwork for; "establish a new department"
pack - set up a committee or legislative body with one's own supporters so as to influence the outcome; "pack a jury"
co-opt - appoint summarily or commandeer; "The army tried to co-opt peasants into civil defence groups"
3.constitute - to compose or represent:"This wall forms the background of the stage setting"; "The branches made a roof"; "This makes a fine introduction"
constitute, make up, comprise, be, represent - form or compose; "This money is my only income"; "The stone wall was the backdrop for the performance"; "These constitute my entire belonging"; "The children made up the chorus"; "This sum represents my entire income for a year"; "These few men comprise his entire army"
chelate - form a chelate, in chemistry
add - constitute an addition; "This paper will add to her reputation"
4.constitute - set up or lay the groundwork for; "establish a new department"
initiate, pioneer - take the lead or initiative in; participate in the development of; "This South African surgeon pioneered heart transplants"
fix - set or place definitely; "Let's fix the date for the party!"
appoint, constitute, name, nominate - create and charge with a task or function; "nominate a committee"

constitute

verb
1. represent, be, consist of, embody, exemplify, be equivalent to The result of the vote hardly constitutes a victory.
2. make up, make, form, compose, comprise The country's ethnic minorities constitute 7 per cent of its total population.
3. set up, found, name, create, commission, establish, appoint, delegate, nominate, enact, authorize, empower, ordain, depute On 6 July a People's Revolutionary Government was constituted.

constitute

verb
1. To be the constituent parts of:
compose, form, make (up).
2. To be equivalent or tantamount:
Idiom: have all the earmarks.
3. To put in force or cause to be by legal authority:
4. To bring into existence formally:
Translations
يُكَوِّن، يُشَكِّل
představovattvořitustavit
udgøre
gera, mynda
keltikonstitucijakonstitucinispagal konstituciją
izveidotradītsastādīt
oluşturmak

constitute

[ˈkɒnstɪtjuːt] VT
1. (= amount to) → significar, constituir; (= make up) → constituir, componer
2. (frm) (= appoint, set up) → constituir
to constitute o.s. a judgeconstituirse en juez

constitute

[ˈkɒnstɪtjuːt] vt
(= count as) → constituer
(= make up) → constituer, représenter

constitute

vt
(= make up)bilden, ausmachen; society is so constituted that …die Gesellschaft ist so aufgebaut, dass …
(= amount to)darstellen; that constitutes a liedas ist eine glatte Lüge
(= set up, give legal authority to) committee, courteinrichten, konstituieren (form)
(form: = appoint) → ernennen or bestimmen zu; he constituted himself my bodyguarder spielte meinen Leibwächter

constitute

[ˈkɒnstɪˌtjuːt] vtcostituire

constitute

(ˈkonstitjuːt) verb
to form; to make up; to be. Nuclear waste constitutes a serious danger.
ˌconstiˈtution noun
1. a set of rules governing an organization; the supreme laws and rights of a country's people etc. the constitution of the country.
2. physical characteristics, health etc. He has a strong constitution.
ˌconstiˈtutional adjective
legal according to a given constitution. The proposed change would not be constitutional.
ˌconstiˈtutionally adverb

constitute

v. constituir, componer, formar.
References in classic literature ?
But as for the old structure of our story, its white-oak frame, and its boards, shingles, and crumbling plaster, and even the huge, clustered chimney in the midst, seemed to constitute only the least and meanest part of its reality.
When such personages could constitute a part of the spectacle, without risking the majesty, or reverence of rank and office, it was safely to be inferred that the infliction of a legal sentence would have an earnest and effectual meaning.
The small village was alive with no inviting sounds; hoarse, guttural voices contending at the hand-mills where their morsel of hard corn was yet to be ground into meal, to fit it for the cake that was to constitute their only supper.
I do not hesitate to say, that those who call themselves Abolitionists should at once effectually withdraw their support, both in person and property, from the government of Massachusetts, and not wait till they constitute a majority of one, before they suffer the right to prevail through them.
I measured the ground which this ass traversed, and arrived at the conclusion that what he had accomplished inside of twenty minutes would constitute some such job as this--relatively speaking--for a man; to wit: to strap two eight-hundred-pound horses together, carry them eighteen hundred feet, mainly over (not around) boulders averaging six feet high, and in the course of the journey climb up and jump from the top of one precipice like Niagara, and three steeples, each a hundred and twenty feet high; and then put the horses down, in an exposed place, without anybody to watch them, and go off to indulge in some other idiotic miracle for vanity's sake.
Violent as he had seemed in his despair, he, in truth, loved me far too well and too tenderly to constitute himself my tyrant: he would have given me half his fortune, without demanding so much as a kiss in return, rather than I should have flung myself friendless on the wide world.
This was usually said in the Doctor's presence, and appeared to me to constitute Annie's principal inducement for withdrawing her objections when she made any.
The girl's highly strung imagination, her affectionate and credulous mind, the primitive education which had surrounded her childhood with a circle of legends, the constant brooding over her dead father and, above all, the state of sublime ecstasy into which music threw her from the moment that this art was made manifest to her in certain exceptional conditions, as in the churchyard at Perros; all this seemed to him to constitute a moral ground only too favorable for the malevolent designs of some mysterious and unscrupulous person.
In many instances, the conviction of religious obligation formed one and a powerful inducement of the adventures; but in none, excepting the settlement at Plymouth, did they constitute the sole and exclusive actuating cause.
Having undertaken for the Glory of God, and Advancement of the Christian Faith, and the Honour of our King and Country, a Voyage to plant the first colony in the Northerne Parts of Virginia; doe, by these Presents, solemnly and mutually in the Presence of God and one of another, covenant and combine ourselves together into a civill Body Politick, for our better Ordering and Preservation, and Furtherance of the Ends aforesaid; And by Virtue hereof do enact, constitute, and frame, such just and equall Laws, Ordinances, Acts, Constitutions, and Offices, from time to time, as shall be thought most meete and convenient for the Generall Good of the Colonie; unto which we promise all due Submission and Obedience.
I had after this described the reasonable soul, and shown that it could by no means be educed from the power of matter, as the other things of which I had spoken, but that it must be expressly created; and that it is not sufficient that it be lodged in the human body exactly like a pilot in a ship, unless perhaps to move its members, but that it is necessary for it to be joined and united more closely to the body, in order to have sensations and appetites similar to ours, and thus constitute a real man.
This shall accordingly constitute the subject of my next address.