constraint


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con·straint

 (kən-strānt′)
n.
1. The threat or use of force to prevent, restrict, or dictate the action or thought of others.
2. The state of being restricted or confined within prescribed bounds: soon tired of the constraint of military life.
3. One that restricts, limits, or regulates; a check: ignored all moral constraints in his pursuit of success.
4. Embarrassed reserve or reticence; awkwardness: "All constraint had vanished between the two, and they began to talk" (Edith Wharton).

[Middle English constreinte, from Old French, from feminine past participle of constraindre, to constrain; see constrain.]

constraint

(kənˈstreɪnt)
n
1. compulsion, force, or restraint
2. repression or control of natural feelings or impulses
3. a forced unnatural manner; inhibition
4. something that serves to constrain; restrictive condition: social constraints kept him silent.
5. (Grammar) linguistics any very general restriction on a sentence formation rule

con•straint

(kənˈstreɪnt)

n.
1. limitation or restriction.
2. repression of natural feelings and impulses.
3. unnatural restraint in manner; embarrassment.
4. something that constrains.
5. the act of constraining.
6. the condition of being constrained.
[1350–1400; Middle English constreinte < Middle French, n. use of feminine past participle of constreindre; see constrain]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.constraint - the state of being physically constrainedconstraint - the state of being physically constrained; "dogs should be kept under restraint"
confinement - the state of being confined; "he was held in confinement"
cage - something that restricts freedom as a cage restricts movement
2.constraint - a device that retards something's motion; "the car did not have proper restraints fitted"
air bag - a safety restraint in an automobile; the bag inflates on collision and prevents the driver or passenger from being thrown forward
airbrake, dive brake - a small parachute or articulated flap to reduce the speed of an aircraft
arrester, arrester hook - a restraint that slows airplanes as they land on the flight deck of an aircraft carrier
band - a restraint put around something to hold it together
brake - a restraint used to slow or stop a vehicle
brake - anything that slows or hinders a process; "she wan not ready to put the brakes on her life with a marriage"; "new legislation will put the brakes on spending"
brake pad - one of the pads that apply friction to both sides of the brake disk
brake shoe, skid, shoe - a restraint provided when the brake linings are moved hydraulically against the brake drum to retard the wheel's rotation
catch, stop - a restraint that checks the motion of something; "he used a book as a stop to hold the door open"
chain - anything that acts as a restraint
device - an instrumentality invented for a particular purpose; "the device is small enough to wear on your wrist"; "a device intended to conserve water"
fastening, holdfast, fastener, fixing - restraint that attaches to something or holds something in place
gag, muzzle - restraint put into a person's mouth to prevent speaking or shouting
leash, tether, lead - restraint consisting of a rope (or light chain) used to restrain an animal
ignition lock, lock - a restraint incorporated into the ignition switch to prevent the use of a vehicle by persons who do not have the key
muzzle - a leather or wire restraint that fits over an animal's snout (especially a dog's nose and jaws) and prevents it from eating or biting
life belt, safety belt, safety harness - belt attaching you to some object as a restraint in order to prevent you from getting hurt
sea anchor, drogue - restraint consisting of a canvas covered frame that floats behind a vessel; prevents drifting or maintains the heading into a wind
hamper, shackle, trammel, bond - a restraint that confines or restricts freedom (especially something used to tie down or restrain a prisoner)
trammel - a restraint that is used to teach a horse to amble
3.constraint - the act of constraining; the threat or use of force to control the thoughts or behavior of others
restriction, confinement - the act of keeping something within specified bounds (by force if necessary); "the restriction of the infection to a focal area"
swaddling clothes - restrictions placed on the immature

constraint

noun
1. restriction, limitation, curb, rein, deterrent, hindrance, damper, check Their decision to abandon the trip was made because of financial constraints.
2. force, pressure, necessity, restraint, compulsion, coercion People are not morally responsible for that which they do under constraint or compulsion.
3. repression, reservation, embarrassment, restraint, inhibition, timidity, diffidence, bashfulness She feels no constraint in discussing sexual matters.

constraint

noun
1. Power used to overcome resistance:
2. The act of limiting or condition of being limited:
Translations
begrenzingbeperkinginperkingrandvoorwaarde

constraint

[kənˈstreɪnt] N
1. (= compulsion) → coacción f, fuerza f
under constraintobligado (a ello)
2. (= limit) → restricción f
budgetary constraintsrestricciones presupuestarias
3. (= restraint) → reserva f, cohibición f
to feel a certain constraintsentirse algo cohibido

constraint

[kənˈstreɪnt] n
(= restriction) → contrainte f
(= embarrassment) → gêne f

constraint

n
(= compulsion)Zwang m
(= restriction)Beschränkung f, → Einschränkung f; to place constraints on somethingeiner Sache (dat)Zwänge auferlegen
(in manner etc) → Gezwungenheit f; (= embarrassment)Befangenheit f

constraint

[kənˈstreɪnt] n no pl (compulsion) → costrizione f; (restraint) → limitazione f; (embarrassment) → imbarazzo, soggezione f
References in classic literature ?
In strange contrast to the hardly tolerable constraint and nameless invisible domineerings of the captain's table, was the entire care-free license and ease, the almost frantic democracy of those inferior fellows the harpooneers.
Shelby both felt annoyed and degraded by the familiar impudence of the trader, and yet both saw the absolute necessity of putting a constraint on their feelings.
There being no constraint, a change of subject is always in order, and so a body is not likely to keep pegging at a single topic until it grows tiresome.
All constraint and formality quickly disappeared, and the friendliest feeling succeeded.
The Lowood constraint still clings to you somewhat; controlling your features, muffling your voice, and restricting your limbs; and you fear in the presence of a man and a brother--or father, or master, or what you will--to smile too gaily, speak too freely, or move too quickly: but, in time, I think you will learn to be natural with me, as I find it impossible to be conventional with you; and then your looks and movements will have more vivacity and variety than they dare offer now.
His constraint was so manifest, and it was so manifest, too, that it originated in an unwillingness to approach the subject, that Charles Darnay hesitated.
There was a twitch of Miss Betsey's head, after each of these sentences, as if her own old wrongs were working within her, and she repressed any plainer reference to them by strong constraint.
I answered with a constraint I made no attempt to disguise, that I had seen Mr.
The livelong day he sat in his loom, his ear filled with its monotony, his eyes bent close down on the slow growth of sameness in the brownish web, his muscles moving with such even repetition that their pause seemed almost as much a constraint as the holding of his breath.
He was all for nature and liberty, whereas I had now come to realise the charm of the artificial, and the social value of constraint.
He, however, only laughed at her advice, saying, that his father had always kept him in too great constraint, and that now he rejoiced at his new-found liberty.
Because the passions of men will not conform to the dictates of reason and justice, without constraint.

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