constriction


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Related to constriction: constriction ring, pupillary constriction

con·stric·tion

 (kən-strĭk′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of constricting.
b. The condition or result of being constricted.
c. Something that constricts.
2. A feeling of tightness or pressure: Fear caused a sudden constriction in my chest.
3. A constricted or narrow part.

constriction

(kənˈstrɪkʃən)
n
1. a feeling of tightness in some part of the body, such as the chest
2. the act of constricting or condition of being constricted
3. something that is constricted
4. (Genetics) genetics a localized narrow region of a chromosome, esp at the centromere
conˈstrictive adj
conˈstrictively adv
conˈstrictiveness n

con•stric•tion

(kənˈstrɪk ʃən)

n.
1. the act of constricting.
2. the state of being constricted; tightness or inward pressure.
3. a constricted part.
4. something that constricts.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Late Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.constriction - a narrowing that reduces the flow through a channel
narrowing - an instance of becoming narrow
2.constriction - tight or narrow compression
compression, contraction, condensation - the process or result of becoming smaller or pressed together; "the contraction of a gas on cooling"
3.constriction - a tight feeling in some part of the body; "he felt a constriction in her chest"; "she felt an alarming tightness in her chest"; "emotion caused a constriction of his throat"
feeling - a physical sensation that you experience; "he had a queasy feeling"; "I had a strange feeling in my leg"; "he lost all feeling in his arm"
4.constriction - the action or process of compressing
spasm - (pathology) sudden constriction of a hollow organ (as a blood vessel)
squeeze - the act of forcing yourself (or being forced) into or through a restricted space; "getting through that small opening was a tight squeeze"
strangulation - (pathology) constriction of a body part so as to cut off the flow of blood or other fluid; "strangulation of the intestine"
compressing, compression - applying pressure
vasoconstriction - decrease in the diameter of blood vessels

constriction

noun tightness, pressure, narrowing, reduction, squeezing, restriction, constraint, cramp, compression, blockage, stenosis (Pathology), limitation, impediment, stricture Smoking tobacco products causes constriction of the arteries.

constriction

noun
1. A becoming narrow or narrower:
Pathology: stricture.
2. A compressing of something:
Translations

constriction

[kənˈstrɪkʃən] N [of vein] → estrangulamiento m

constriction

[kənˈstrɪkʃən] n
[throat, blood vessel] → resserrement m
(= limitation) [life, activity] → limitation f
(= restriction) → contrainte f

constriction

n
(of muscles)Zusammenziehen nt; he had a feeling of constriction in his chester hatte ein Gefühl der Enge in der Brust
(= limiting, of movements) → Behinderung f; (caused by rules, traditions etc) → Einengung f; (of outlook, view etc)Beschränkung f

constriction

[kənˈstrɪkʃn] ncostrizione f; (feeling) → oppressione f

constriction

n constricción f
References in classic literature ?
His chest heaved once, as if his large heart, weary of despotic constriction, had expanded, despite the will, and made a vigorous bound for the attainment of liberty.
A painful sense of constriction came in his chest, and he turned pale and stopped with his hand on the lock.
In exchange for his silence Athos drank enough for four, and without appearing to be otherwise affected by wine than by a more marked constriction of the brow and by a deeper sadness.
Osborne complained of constriction of the chest - but this soon wore off.
Rose rewarded him with her bubbling delight and her aunt noticed with an odd constriction about her heart how Bill revelled at last in the new treasure, until now so hopelessly coveted.
John was decidedly cautious, as she could see by the sudden constriction of his lips, and had no intention of revealing his soul to a young lady.
I had just begun to fancy that I felt the constriction round my temples again when Mrs.
All that night Saxon lay, unsleeping, without taking off her clothes, and when she arose in the morning and washed her face and dressed her hair she was aware of a strange numbness, of a feeling of constriction about her head as if it were bound by a heavy band of iron.
I knew she could retain a thinking attitude a long time without change; at last, a tear fell; she had been looking at the name on the stone before her, and her heart had no doubt endured one of those constrictions with which the desolate living, regretting the dead, are, at times, so sorely oppressed.
7 million has also been released for the constriction of road from Hayatabad to Karkhano Chowk.
Constriction as a means to subdue prey has rarely been observed in venomous snakes but has been seen in B.