constructivism


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con·struc·tiv·ism

 (kən-strŭk′tə-vĭz′əm)
n.
A movement in modern art originating in Moscow in 1920 and characterized by the use of industrial materials such as glass, sheet metal, and plastic to create nonrepresentational, often geometric objects.

con·struc′tiv·ist n.

constructivism

(kənˈstrʌktɪˌvɪzəm)
n
1. (Art Movements) a movement in abstract art evolved in Russia after World War I, primarily by Naum Gabo, which explored the use of movement and machine-age materials in sculpture and had considerable influence on modern art and architecture
2. (Philosophy) philosophy the theory that mathematical entities do not exist independently of our construction of them. Compare intuitionism4, finitism
conˈstructivist adj, n

con•struc•tiv•ism

(kənˈstrʌk təˌvɪz əm)

n. (sometimes cap.)
a nonrepresentational style of art developed in Russia in the early 20th century and characterized chiefly by a severe formality and by the use of modern industrial materials.
[1920–25]
con•struc′tiv•ist, n., adj.

constructivism

the theories, attitudes, and techniques of a group of Soviet writers of the 1920s who attempted to reconcile ideological beliefs with technical achievement, especially in stage design, where effects produced were geometrical and nonrepresentational. — constructivist, n., adj.
See also: Drama
the theories, attitudes, and techniques of a group of Soviet writers of the 1920s who attempted to reconcile ideological beliefs with technical achievement, especially in stage design, where the effects produced were geometrical and nonrepresentational. — constructivist, n., adj.
See also: Literary Style
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.constructivism - an abstractionist artistic movement in Russia after World War I; industrial materials were used to construct nonrepresentational objects
art movement, artistic movement - a group of artists who agree on general principles
constructivist - an artist of the school of constructivism
Translations
konstruktivizam
constructivisme
konstruktivism

constructivism

[kənˈstrʌktɪvɪzəm] Nconstructivismo m
References in periodicals archive ?
Some topics under discussion include FoucaultAEs critique of technical disciplines such as criminology and psychiatry, and the contributions of science and technology studies to critical constructivism.
What Jensen means by an "aesthetic" version of epistemological constructivism is this: "Highlighting, foregrounding, arranging, depicting, portraying, turning the mundane into the crucial, turning the unorganized welter into recognizable patterns, turning the plethora of possible facts into a meaningful investigation into essential ones--that is art for Nietzsche as much as is painting or composing music, and that is what separates the historians' constructivism from scientific description.
Realism, especially its neorealist variant, dismisses ASEAN as largely irrelevant, while constructivism focuses on ASEAN as the focal point of a regional effort to build a Southeast Asian identity that is in the process of altering how regional states interact.
This article explores how distinct epistemological assumptions in constructivism and phenomenology influence pedagogical approaches in counselor education.
Why is it that constructivism is so often referenced in the clinical literature, yet organizationally it counts only a small number of people among its identifiable adherents and struggles to sustain itself as a coherent movement within the field?
It is also interesting to notice that central to the Cognitivist epistemology are three key perspectives including contextual views, constructivism and information-processing theory (Jones, 1995).
The present study is concerned with the examination of higher secondary biology instruction taking into account constructivism as a learning theory that can be largely examined without considering broader philosophical or the epistemological standpoint of constructivism.
The article, 'Constructivism: A Holistic Approach to Teaching and Learning' by Janet Giesen, Faculty Development and Instructional Design Center, Northern Illinois University, offers constructivism as a learning theory.
The chapter on career development theory also adds consideration of constructivism, social constructivism, and chaos theory.
ERIC Descriptors: Second Language Learning; Literacy; Constructivism (Learning); Epistemology; Educational Philosophy; Socialization; Cultural Influences; Ethnography; Multiple Literacies; Second Language Instruction; Research Methodology; Educational Objectives; Grammar; Scaffolding (Teaching Technique); Chinese; English (Second Language); College Students; Second Languages
In the attempt to answer this question, Rockmore accounts for the history of epistemology, particularly since Kant, but he also explores the classical Greek sources of Kant's constructivism.
Barbara Bassot presents a view of social constructivism derived from the work of Vygotsky.