constructivism

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con·struc·tiv·ism

 (kən-strŭk′tə-vĭz′əm)
n.
A movement in modern art originating in Moscow in 1920 and characterized by the use of industrial materials such as glass, sheet metal, and plastic to create nonrepresentational, often geometric objects.

con·struc′tiv·ist n.

constructivism

(kənˈstrʌktɪˌvɪzəm)
n
1. (Art Movements) a movement in abstract art evolved in Russia after World War I, primarily by Naum Gabo, which explored the use of movement and machine-age materials in sculpture and had considerable influence on modern art and architecture
2. (Philosophy) philosophy the theory that mathematical entities do not exist independently of our construction of them. Compare intuitionism4, finitism
conˈstructivist adj, n

con•struc•tiv•ism

(kənˈstrʌk təˌvɪz əm)

n. (sometimes cap.)
a nonrepresentational style of art developed in Russia in the early 20th century and characterized chiefly by a severe formality and by the use of modern industrial materials.
[1920–25]
con•struc′tiv•ist, n., adj.

constructivism

the theories, attitudes, and techniques of a group of Soviet writers of the 1920s who attempted to reconcile ideological beliefs with technical achievement, especially in stage design, where effects produced were geometrical and nonrepresentational. — constructivist, n., adj.
See also: Drama
the theories, attitudes, and techniques of a group of Soviet writers of the 1920s who attempted to reconcile ideological beliefs with technical achievement, especially in stage design, where the effects produced were geometrical and nonrepresentational. — constructivist, n., adj.
See also: Literary Style
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.constructivism - an abstractionist artistic movement in Russia after World War I; industrial materials were used to construct nonrepresentational objects
art movement, artistic movement - a group of artists who agree on general principles
constructivist - an artist of the school of constructivism
Translations
konstruktivizam
constructivisme
konstruktivism

constructivism

[kənˈstrʌktɪvɪzəm] Nconstructivismo m
References in periodicals archive ?
In view of constructivists, learners must not be considered as empty or blank vessels required to be filled; instead students are energetic and active participants making meaning and sense of the newly received knowledge in relation to (based) on knowledge already existing in their mind i.
Insofar as this is the case, we wish not to criticize constructivist pedagogy so much as show how its practitioners might benefit from considering ways in which phenomenology might contribute to critical goals held by constructivists and humanists called to the counselor training persuasion:
Borrowing the language of radical constructivism, the resulting contributions are intended to "perturb" the status quo and get constructivists and non-constructivists alike thinking about constructivism's past, future, strengths, weaknesses, and overall utility.
One can say that constructivists epistemology and science epistemology are different from one another when they are related to science education.
The latter idea is associated with the critical constructivists, which is the group that Richert chooses to integrate with existential thinking.
Firstly inter-relationships, both constructivists and mental health clinicians are interested in forming a connection with interview participants or clients.
One meaning of relativistic or relativism suggests that there are no preferred perspectives and one should not privilege any perspective over another; I disagree that constructivists must, by definition, hold to this position.
The constructivists propose several instructional strategies among them cooperative learning, collaborative learning, problem based learning etc.
Constructivists treat mind and nervous system as examples of such systems.
The need for openness and imagination on the part of clients is particularly apparent regarding those constructivists advocating that clients apply post modern principles to the task of designing their identity.
The volume was stimulated by the 2007 annual convention of the American Educational Research Association, which was an occasion for constructivists and advocates of explicit instruction ("instructionists") to debate about both theoretical and practical issues.
A founder of American pragmatism, Dewey (1859-1952) is now highly regarded by constructivists for his critique of traditional epistemology and assertion that philosophy and science are always embedded in context of cultural practice.