consubstantiation


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con·sub·stan·ti·a·tion

 (kŏn′səb-stăn′shē-ā′shən)
n.
The doctrine, held by some Christian churches, that the substance of the body and blood of Jesus coexists with the substance of the bread and wine in the Eucharist.

consubstantiation

(ˌkɒnsəbˌstænʃɪˈeɪʃən)
(in the belief of High-Church Anglicans) n
1. (Theology) the doctrine that after the consecration of the Eucharist the substance of the body and blood of Christ coexists within the substance of the consecrated bread and wine
2. (Theology) the mystical process by which this is believed to take place during consecration

con•sub•stan•ti•a•tion

(ˌkɒn səbˌstæn ʃiˈeɪ ʃən)

n.
the doctrine that the substance of the body and blood of Christ coexist in and with the bread and wine of the Eucharist.
[1590–1600; < New Latin]

consubstantiation

the doctrine that the substance of the body and blood of Christ coexist in and with the substance of the bread and wine of the Eucharist. Cf. receptionism, transubstantiation, virtualism.
See also: Theology
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.consubstantiation - the doctrine of the High Anglican Church that after the consecration of the Eucharist the substance of the body and blood of Christ coexists with the substance of the consecrated bread and wine
theological doctrine - the doctrine of a religious group
Translations

consubstantiation

n (Eccl) → Konsubstantiation f
References in periodicals archive ?
5) The African principle of Ubuntu ("I am because we are") is also the mind-body connection prototype to the modern Christian Eucharist doctrine of Consubstantiation i.
Examined critically in its full context, this text is a prima facie witness or background not for a conversion of the elements, what the later tradition called transubstantiation, but rather for some kind of multiple presences, what the later tradition called 11 consubstantiation.
They knew the Spanish language and its consubstantiation with Argentine is attested by the externalized patriotism emanating from the celebration of May 25 and July 9.
The marketing plan can be understood as the consubstantiation of the formal planning exercise, being the planning a helical procedure and the plan, a linear one (Campomar & Ikeda, 2006).
The substitution of images for the person might matter less for some prominent figures in the media, but because of the contextualized meanings of Martin the person and Martin the icon with protests, this person/symbol consubstantiation matters much more.
Use of this genre of rhetorics, I argue, gives voice to the suffering that is common to humankind; it is this rhetorical strategy that allows Black religious leaders to achieve consubstantiation with their audiences.
Uyariyku yawarniypa chiriyninta, katatasqanta" / "Escucha el, frio de mi sangre, su temblor helado" invites readers to symbolically join the consubstantiation ritual described earlier; by engaging in a dramatic voicing of the poem and feeling the vibrations of the collective speaker pass through their own bodies, readers may figuratively step into the position of the Andean speaker.
Consubstantiation means that cosmological spirit is shared across individuals (African Psychology Institute, 1982; Azibo, 1996b).
On the Eucharist, they were in agreement in rejecting transubstantiation, but their views ranged whole spectrum from consubstantiation to bare memorial; many (including Wycliffe himself) affirmed the Real Presence of Christ while others denied it.
In the Lutheran tradition, the technical term for understanding how God shows up in communion is consubstantiation.
Reformed Protestantism was distinguished not only by its rejection of both transubstantiation and consubstantiation (the Roman and Lutheran interpretations of Christ's words "This is my body") but also by its emphasis on church-based social reform and its casting of the civil polity as a Corpus Christianum.