consuetude


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con·sue·tude

 (kŏn′swĭ-to͞od′, -tyo͞od′)
n.
Custom; usage.

[Middle English, from Latin cōnsuētūdō; see custom.]

con′sue·tu′di·nar′y (-to͞od′n-ĕr′ē, -tyo͞od′-) adj.

consuetude

(ˈkɒnswɪˌtjuːd)
n
(Law) an established custom or usage, esp one having legal force
[C14: from Latin consuētūdō, from consuēscere to accustom, from con- + suēscere to be wont]
ˌconsueˈtudinary adj

con•sue•tude

(ˈkɒn swɪˌtud, -ˌtyud)

n.
a social usage; custom.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin consuētūdō]
con`sue•tu′di•nar′y, adj.

consuetude

a habit or custom; usual behavior.
See also: Behavior
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.consuetude - a custom or usage that has acquired the force of law
custom, usage, usance - accepted or habitual practice

consuetude

noun
A habitual way of behaving:
Translations

consuetude

n (form)normative Kraft des Faktischen (form)
References in classic literature ?
Late,--very late,--we perceive that no arrangements, no introductions, no consuetudes or habits of society would be of any avail to establish us in such relations with them as we desire,--but solely the uprise of nature in us to the same degree it is in them; then shall we meet as water with water; and if we should not meet them then, we shall not want them, for we are already they.
By contrast, she describes the use of the term consuetude as associated with sin, such as Augustine does in his Confessions when he writes that "a lust [libido] always obeyed became a custom [consuetudo].
Green and Ron Shachar, "Habit Formation and Political Behaviour: Evidence of Consuetude in Voter Turnout," British Journal of Political Science 30, no.