contemplation

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con·tem·pla·tion

 (kŏn′təm-plā′shən)
n.
1. The act or state of contemplating.
2. Thoughtful observation or study.
3. Meditation on spiritual matters, especially as a form of devotion.
4. Intention or expectation: sought further information in contemplation of a career change.

contemplation

(ˌkɒntɛmˈpleɪʃən; -təm-)
n
1. thoughtful or long consideration or observation
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) spiritual meditation, esp (in Christian religious practice) concentration of the mind and soul upon God. Compare meditation
3. purpose or intention

con•tem•pla•tion

(ˌkɒn təmˈpleɪ ʃən, -tɛm-)

n.
1. the act of contemplating; thoughtful observation.
2. full or deep consideration; meditation; reflection: religious contemplation.
3. purpose or intention.
4. prospect or expectation.
[1175–1225; Middle English < Anglo-French < Latin]
contemplate, contemplation - The base of contemplate and comtemplation is Latin templum, "open space for observation."
See also related terms for observation.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.contemplation - a long and thoughtful observationcontemplation - a long and thoughtful observation  
stare - a fixed look with eyes open wide
2.contemplation - a calm, lengthy, intent considerationcontemplation - a calm, lengthy, intent consideration
cogitation, study - attentive consideration and meditation; "after much cogitation he rejected the offer"
consideration - the process of giving careful thought to something
meditation, speculation - continuous and profound contemplation or musing on a subject or series of subjects of a deep or abstruse nature; "the habit of meditation is the basis for all real knowledge"
meditation - (religion) contemplation of spiritual matters (usually on religious or philosophical subjects)
introspection, self-contemplation, self-examination - the contemplation of your own thoughts and desires and conduct
retrospect - contemplation of things past; "in retrospect"

contemplation

noun
1. thought, consideration, reflection, musing, meditation, pondering, deliberation, reverie, rumination, cogitation The garden is a place of quiet contemplation.
2. observation, viewing, looking at, survey, examination, inspection, scrutiny, gazing at He was lost in contemplation of the landscape.

contemplation

noun
1. An act of directing the eyes on an object:
Translations
تَأمُّل، تَفْكير
uvažování
fordybelsemeditation
szemlélõdés
íhugun
düşünceye dalma

contemplation

[ˌkɒntemˈpleɪʃən] Ncontemplación f, meditación f

contemplation

[ˌkɒntəmˈpleɪʃən] n (= deep thought) → contemplation f

contemplation

n no pl
(= act of looking)Betrachtung f
(= act of thinking)Nachdenken nt (→ of über +acc); (= deep thought)Besinnung f, → Betrachtung f, → Kontemplation f (esp Rel); a life of contemplationein beschauliches or kontemplatives (esp Rel) → Leben; deep in contemplationin Gedanken versunken
(= expectation)Erwartung f

contemplation

[ˌkɒntɛmˈpleɪʃn] ncontemplazione f

contemplate

(ˈkontəmpleit) verb
1. to think seriously (about). I was contemplating (= feeling inclined towards) having a holiday; She contemplated her future gloomily.
2. to look thoughtfully at. The little boy stood contemplating himself in the mirror.
ˌcontemˈplation noun
contemplative (kənˈtemplətiv) , ((American) ˈkontəmpleitiv) adjective
conˈtemplatively adverb
References in classic literature ?
And how nobly it raises our conceit of the mighty, misty monster, to behold him solemnly sailing through a calm tropical sea; his vast, mild head overhung by a canopy of vapor, engendered by his incommunicable contemplations, and that vapor --as you will sometimes see it --glorified by a rainbow, as if Heaven itself had put its seal upon his thoughts.
I must get off him first, that he may pursue his contemplations too.
It is a common amusement of speculative minds to contrast the magnitude of the most important events with the minuteness of their primeval causes, and the records of mankind are full of examples for such contemplations.
To my own contemplations, at least, it has often recurred, always exciting wonder, but with a sense that the story must be true, and a conception of its hero's character.
What principally delighted Julia in these contemplations on the acquaintance of Anna, was the strong inclination he had expressed to know herself.
While busy with these contemplations he heard the rustling of a silken garment, and, turning, beheld Beatrice emerging from beneath the sculptured portal.