contemplative


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con·tem·pla·tive

 (kən-tĕm′plə-tĭv, kŏn′təm-plā′-)
adj.
Disposed to or characterized by contemplation. See Synonyms at pensive.
n.
1. A person given to contemplation.
2. A member of a religious order that emphasizes meditation.

con·tem′pla·tive·ly adv.
con·tem′pla·tive·ness n.

contemplative

(ˈkɒntɛmˌpleɪtɪv; -təm-; kənˈtɛmplə-)
adj
denoting, concerned with, or inclined to contemplation; meditative
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) a person dedicated to religious contemplation or to a way of life conducive to this
ˈcontemˌplatively adv
ˈcontemˌplativeness n

con•tem•pla•tive

(kənˈtɛm plə tɪv, ˈkɒn təmˌpleɪ-, -tɛm-)

adj.
1. given to or characterized by contemplation.
n.
2. a person devoted to contemplation, as a monk.
[1300–50; Middle English < Anglo-French < Latin]
con•tem′pla•tive•ly, adv.
con•tem′pla•tive•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.contemplative - a person devoted to the contemplative life
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
Adj.1.contemplative - deeply or seriously thoughtful; "Byron lives on not only in his poetry, but also in his creation of the 'Byronic hero' - the persona of a brooding melancholy young man";
thoughtful - exhibiting or characterized by careful thought; "a thoughtful paper"

contemplative

adjective thoughtful, reflective, introspective, rapt, meditative, pensive, ruminative, in a brown study, intent, musing, deep or lost in thought He is a quiet, contemplative sort of chap.

contemplative

adjective
Of, characterized by, or disposed to thought:
Idiom: in a brown study.
Translations
تَأمُّلي، مولَع بِالتَأمُّل
přemýšlivýzádumčivý
tankefuld
szemlélõdõ
íhugull

contemplative

[kənˈtemplətɪv] ADJcontemplativo

contemplative

adj
(= thoughtful) look, personnachdenklich; mood alsobesinnlich
life, religious orderbeschaulich, kontemplativ

contemplative

[kənˈtɛmplətɪv] adjcontemplativo/a

contemplate

(ˈkontəmpleit) verb
1. to think seriously (about). I was contemplating (= feeling inclined towards) having a holiday; She contemplated her future gloomily.
2. to look thoughtfully at. The little boy stood contemplating himself in the mirror.
ˌcontemˈplation noun
contemplative (kənˈtemplətiv) , ((American) ˈkontəmpleitiv) adjective
conˈtemplatively adverb
References in classic literature ?
Soft, mildly, and cheerfully contemplative, with full, red lips, just on the verge of a smile, which the eyes seemed to herald by a gentle kindling-up of their orbs
How now in the contemplative evening of his days, the pious Bildad reconciled these things in the reminiscence, I do not know; but it did not seem to concern him much, and very probably he had long since come to the sage and sensible conclusion that a man's religion is one thing, and this practical world quite another.
If he looks out through the glass, the boldest boy (Steerforth excepted) stops in the middle of a shout or yell, and becomes contemplative.
It was Godfrey's custom on a Sunday afternoon to do a little contemplative farming in a leisurely walk.
But here he was interrupted by his fair physician, a smile which she could scarce suppress dimpling for an instant a face, whose general expression was that of contemplative melancholy.
Mifroid, replacing his gleaming glasses on his nose, fixed the stage-manager with a contemplative stare.
Nothing remains but the COUP D'OEIL, the contemplative man's enjoyment, Mr.
said a third, abruptly-- a little, contemplative, dark man, smoking a pipe.
Little is known of his life, except that he was Secretary to the Board of Rites and retired from this position to lead the contemplative life.
Porthos pretended that this occupation was proof of a reflective and contemplative organization, and he had brought him this gentleman, for whom he believed himself to be engaged, had won Planchet--that was the name of the Picard.
Perhaps a germ of love was springing in their hearts, so pure that it might blossom in Paradise, since it could not be matured on earth; for women worship such gentle dignity as his; and the proud, contemplative, yet kindly soul is oftenest captivated by simplicity like hers.
All that afternoon he wore a dreamy, contemplative ap- pearance which in him was a mark of perplexity.