contemplative

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con·tem·pla·tive

 (kən-tĕm′plə-tĭv, kŏn′təm-plā′-)
adj.
Disposed to or characterized by contemplation. See Synonyms at pensive.
n.
1. A person given to contemplation.
2. A member of a religious order that emphasizes meditation.

con·tem′pla·tive·ly adv.
con·tem′pla·tive·ness n.

contemplative

(ˈkɒntɛmˌpleɪtɪv; -təm-; kənˈtɛmplə-)
adj
denoting, concerned with, or inclined to contemplation; meditative
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) a person dedicated to religious contemplation or to a way of life conducive to this
ˈcontemˌplatively adv
ˈcontemˌplativeness n

con•tem•pla•tive

(kənˈtɛm plə tɪv, ˈkɒn təmˌpleɪ-, -tɛm-)

adj.
1. given to or characterized by contemplation.
n.
2. a person devoted to contemplation, as a monk.
[1300–50; Middle English < Anglo-French < Latin]
con•tem′pla•tive•ly, adv.
con•tem′pla•tive•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.contemplative - a person devoted to the contemplative life
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
Adj.1.contemplative - deeply or seriously thoughtful; "Byron lives on not only in his poetry, but also in his creation of the 'Byronic hero' - the persona of a brooding melancholy young man";
thoughtful - exhibiting or characterized by careful thought; "a thoughtful paper"

contemplative

adjective thoughtful, reflective, introspective, rapt, meditative, pensive, ruminative, in a brown study, intent, musing, deep or lost in thought He is a quiet, contemplative sort of chap.

contemplative

adjective
Of, characterized by, or disposed to thought:
Idiom: in a brown study.
Translations
تَأمُّلي، مولَع بِالتَأمُّل
přemýšlivýzádumčivý
tankefuld
szemlélõdõ
íhugull

contemplative

[kənˈtemplətɪv] ADJcontemplativo

contemplative

adj
(= thoughtful) look, personnachdenklich; mood alsobesinnlich
life, religious orderbeschaulich, kontemplativ

contemplative

[kənˈtɛmplətɪv] adjcontemplativo/a

contemplate

(ˈkontəmpleit) verb
1. to think seriously (about). I was contemplating (= feeling inclined towards) having a holiday; She contemplated her future gloomily.
2. to look thoughtfully at. The little boy stood contemplating himself in the mirror.
ˌcontemˈplation noun
contemplative (kənˈtemplətiv) , ((American) ˈkontəmpleitiv) adjective
conˈtemplatively adverb
References in classic literature ?
When you come home you sit down in a sober, contemplative, not uncharitable frame of mind, and apply yourself to your books or your business.
The contemplative atheist is rare: a Diagoras, a Bion, a Lucian perhaps, and some others; and yet they seem to be more than they are; for that all that impugn a received religion, or superstition, are by the adverse part branded with the name of atheists.
Little is known of his life, except that he was Secretary to the Board of Rites and retired from this position to lead the contemplative life.
In spite of a slight tendency to exaggeration, Katharine decidedly hits the mark," he said, and lying back in his chair, with his opaque contemplative eyes fixed on the ceiling, and the tips of his fingers pressed together, he depicted, first the horrors of the streets of Manchester, and then the bare, immense moors on the outskirts of the town, and then the scrubby little house in which the girl would live, and then the professors and the miserable young students devoted to the more strenuous works of our younger dramatists, who would visit her, and how her appearance would change by degrees, and how she would fly to London, and how Katharine would have to lead her about, as one leads an eager dog on a chain, past rows of clamorous butchers' shops, poor dear creature.
It was, I remember, a hot dry summer, favourable to contemplative life out of doors.
And now Veneering shoots out of the Study wherein he is accustomed, when contemplative, to give his mind to the carving and gilding of the Pilgrims going to Canterbury, in order to show Twemlow the little flourish he has prepared for the trumpets of fashion, describing how that on the seventeenth instant, at St James's Church, the Reverend Blank Blank, assisted by the Reverend Dash Dash, united in the bonds of matrimony, Alfred Lammle Esquire, of Sackville Street, Piccadilly, to Sophronia, only daughter of the late Horatio Akershem, Esquire, of Yorkshire.
Nothing remains but the COUP D'OEIL, the contemplative man's enjoyment, Mr.
said a third, abruptly-- a little, contemplative, dark man, smoking a pipe.
My design, when I went abroad, was to divert myself by seeing the wondrous variety of prospects, beasts, birds, fishes, insects, and vegetables, with which God has been pleased to enrich the several parts of this globe; a variety which, as it must give great pleasure to a contemplative beholder, so doth it admirably display the power, and wisdom, and goodness of the Creator.
Each man seemed stunned--deeply contemplative, as it were, and, not quite sure, trying to realize just what had taken place.
Kit, however, fortunately for himself, was not learned enough or contemplative enough to be troubled with presages of evil afar off, and, having no mental spectacles to assist his vision in this respect, saw nothing but the dull house, which jarred uncomfortably upon his previous thoughts.
Intent upon the resolution he had formed, of exposing the real character of the nefarious Jingle, in any quarter in which he might be pursuing his fraudulent designs, he sat at first taciturn and contemplative, brooding over the means by which his purpose could be best attained.