contemplative

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con·tem·pla·tive

 (kən-tĕm′plə-tĭv, kŏn′təm-plā′-)
adj.
Disposed to or characterized by contemplation. See Synonyms at pensive.
n.
1. A person given to contemplation.
2. A member of a religious order that emphasizes meditation.

con·tem′pla·tive·ly adv.
con·tem′pla·tive·ness n.

contemplative

(ˈkɒntɛmˌpleɪtɪv; -təm-; kənˈtɛmplə-)
adj
denoting, concerned with, or inclined to contemplation; meditative
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) a person dedicated to religious contemplation or to a way of life conducive to this
ˈcontemˌplatively adv
ˈcontemˌplativeness n

con•tem•pla•tive

(kənˈtɛm plə tɪv, ˈkɒn təmˌpleɪ-, -tɛm-)

adj.
1. given to or characterized by contemplation.
n.
2. a person devoted to contemplation, as a monk.
[1300–50; Middle English < Anglo-French < Latin]
con•tem′pla•tive•ly, adv.
con•tem′pla•tive•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.contemplative - a person devoted to the contemplative life
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
Adj.1.contemplative - deeply or seriously thoughtful; "Byron lives on not only in his poetry, but also in his creation of the 'Byronic hero' - the persona of a brooding melancholy young man";
thoughtful - exhibiting or characterized by careful thought; "a thoughtful paper"

contemplative

adjective thoughtful, reflective, introspective, rapt, meditative, pensive, ruminative, in a brown study, intent, musing, deep or lost in thought He is a quiet, contemplative sort of chap.

contemplative

adjective
Of, characterized by, or disposed to thought:
Idiom: in a brown study.
Translations
تَأمُّلي، مولَع بِالتَأمُّل
přemýšlivýzádumčivý
tankefuld
szemlélõdõ
íhugull

contemplative

[kənˈtemplətɪv] ADJcontemplativo

contemplative

adj
(= thoughtful) look, personnachdenklich; mood alsobesinnlich
life, religious orderbeschaulich, kontemplativ

contemplative

[kənˈtɛmplətɪv] adjcontemplativo/a

contemplate

(ˈkontəmpleit) verb
1. to think seriously (about). I was contemplating (= feeling inclined towards) having a holiday; She contemplated her future gloomily.
2. to look thoughtfully at. The little boy stood contemplating himself in the mirror.
ˌcontemˈplation noun
contemplative (kənˈtemplətiv) , ((American) ˈkontəmpleitiv) adjective
conˈtemplatively adverb
References in periodicals archive ?
Strictly speaking, most people are not contemplatives.
We do well to call this social solitude "stillness" and to affirm, as contemplatives do, that solitude or stillness is not the same as silence.
Teresa of Avila, Merton envisions the modern contemplative as one who can profit from being aware of the importance of pre-modern contemplatives.
Those who aspire to be (or already are) contemplatives in our frenzied world, will find this book to be an immensely affirming experience.
The church and the world lost one of its great contemplatives when Brother Wayne Teasdale died in October.
And apparently it is resonating with the hearts of both old and young contemplatives alike.
Through "centering prayer" and other approaches, contemplatives take time to get behind the busyness, noise, wordiness, and information overload of today's world.
We do not make contemplatives of ourselves any more than a statue carves itself out of stone.
As his journals chronicle, he found more and more fault with the purely juridical contemplatives who lived a devout regimen in the monastery but reduced the charism to purely external observances.
As one of the questions to the group put it, "What is the call of our time and how must we, as contemplatives, respond?
And he believes that contemplatives have a responsibility to go into the world to make it a better place.