continental crust


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continental crust

n
(Geological Science) geology that part of the earth's crust that underlies the continents and continental shelves
References in periodicals archive ?
Relieved of that weight, the overlying, relatively light continental crust bobbed upward like a cork, thereby raising the mountains.
Island arcs capped by oceanic crust are dominated by mafic magmatism, and those capped by continental crust by felsic magmatism.
Nozaki's work also concerns the broad-scale problem of Earth's carbon cycle: The Pacific plate oceanic crust at the bottom of the trench is destined to be subducted beneath the continental crust of adjacent plates.
The Rift is an example of a divergent plate boundary, where the Earth's tectonic forces are pulling plates apart and creating new continental crust.
After an introduction and regional overview, 12 studies look at such aspects as the structural evolution of Andros in the Greek Cyclades as a key to the behavior of a flat detachment within an extending continental crust, geodetic constraints on kinematics of southwestern Bulgaria and GPS and leveling data, and late Quaternary sedimentation and tectonics in the submarine Sarkoy Canyon in the western Marmara Sea off Turkey.
Continental crust has a much greater preservation potential than oceanic crust.
Drilling equipment finds independent ecosystems lurking 10,000 feet below the continental crust.
In the second half of the 1960s, after geophysical investigations had proved the structural differences between continental and oceanic crusts, both Russian and American scientists decided to drill deep holes to better understand the Conrad and Mohorovicic (Moho) discontinuities (boundaries between the upper and lower continental crust and between the crust and mantle, respectively).
That peel is made up of a continental crust 30 to 40 kilometres thick.
The other components contain "materials" such as basaltic ocean floor (HIMU), pelagic sediments (EM1), oceanic plateaus (EM1), subcontinental lithosphere (EM1, EM2), terrigenous sediments or subducted continental crust (EM2), which have been recycled by subduction processes, and mixed back into the depleted mantle.
If [the object] didn't hit a block of continental crust, then you cannot and will not find an impact site," Bambach says.
Available geophysical data suggest that the Newfoundland Basin contains a zone approximately 150 kilometers wide of thinned continental crust separating known Grand Banks continental crust from known oceanic crust seaward of a mid-Cretaceous period (about 118 million years ago) isochron, a magnetic anomaly known as MO.

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