contingent effects

contingent effects

The effects, both desirable and undesirable, that are in addition to the primary effects associated with a nuclear detonation.
References in periodicals archive ?
She explores the multiple and contingent effects of the concept of autonomy by exploring examples of how the ideal of self-governance (autonomy) has shaped social practices in relation to adolescent sexuality, the drug war, the animal rights movement, and fitness culture in order to show how "autonomy is linked with the Foucauldian idea of subjectification as a modality of power that operates to establish limits on subject formation and, in doing so, creates new forms of subjectivity".
Indeed, the central theme is the contingent effects on technology in organisations of local and wider political contestation, institutional forms and state policy.
To understand when and how responses vary, we must consider both non-contingent and contingent effects of reinforcers.
Levels of variability were much higher in the VAR group than in the REP, as was expected from the contingent effects of reinforcers on variability, shown in the bottom graph of Figure 5.
This study investigates the contingent effects of task environment and task knowledge on auditors' generation of financial reporting alternatives in a situation where the client has an aggressive reporting preference for a complex, ambiguous revenue-recognition issue.
The Contingent Effect of Risk Context and Task Knowledge
Schunk (1993) investigated the contingent effects of music on feeding behavior of premature infants.
The purpose of this study was to assess the contingent effects of music on premature infant behavior, specifically to determine whether pacifier activated lullaby music would reinforce non-nutritive sucking rates of premature infants who were evaluated as poor feeders by NICU personnel.
She points out that they rely on contingent effects rather than something intrinsic to any such act.
Unless the contingent effects of keeping such a promise happen somehow morally to justify its fulfillment, there is no good reason to keep the promise (and of course there is good reason to break it).
We add two and three regularly in different ways in our lives but these probably have very different contingent effects.
Although we applaud Bahm's concern, his model of intrinsic justification will not improve substantive clash because it incorrectly assumes that essential effects are necessarily competitive, and it invalidates debate about contingent effects.