contrabass

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con·tra·bass

 (kŏn′trə-bās′)
adj.
Pitched an octave below the normal bass range.

[Obsolete Italian contrabasso : Italian contra-, against (from Latin contrā-; see contra-) + Italian basso, bass (from Medieval Latin bassus, low).]

con′tra·bass′ist n.

contrabass

(ˌkɒntrəˈbeɪs)
n
1. (Instruments) a member of any of various families of musical instruments that is lower in pitch than the bass
2. (Instruments) another name for double bass
adj
(Instruments) of or denoting the instrument of a family that is lower than the bass
contrabassist n

con•tra•bass

(ˈkɒn trəˌbeɪs)

n. adj.
2. pitched an octave below the bass in a family of instruments.
[1590–1600; < Italian contrabbasso=contra- contra-2 + basso bass1]
con′tra•bass`ist (-ˌbeɪ sɪst, -ˌbæs ɪst) n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.contrabass - largest and lowest member of the violin familycontrabass - largest and lowest member of the violin family
bass - the member with the lowest range of a family of musical instruments
bowed stringed instrument, string - stringed instruments that are played with a bow; "the strings played superlatively well"
Adj.1.contrabass - pitched an octave below normal bass instrumental or vocal range; "contrabass or double-bass clarinet"
low-pitched, low - used of sounds and voices; low in pitch or frequency
Translations

contrabass

[ˌkɒntrəˈbeɪs] Ncontrabajo m
References in periodicals archive ?
A few weeks later, their discussion turned to the makeup of the suing orchestra for the 22 April concert, which according to Rajchmann, included fourteen violins I, ten violins II, eight violas, seven cellos, and seven contrabasses.
Only the groaning of the first violins (at times unbearably Out of tune) and the grating sawing of the contrabasses were audible; at times the rolls of the timpani drowned everything out, or the brass mournfully howled .
Instruments kept in the sub-basement of Jones Hall, including several grand pianos and two contrabasses that are three to four-hundred years old, are presumed lost as well.