contracted

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con·tract

 (kŏn′trăkt′)
n.
1.
a. An agreement between two or more parties, especially one that is written and enforceable by law.
b. The writing or document containing such an agreement.
2. The branch of law dealing with formal agreements between parties.
3. Marriage as a formal agreement; betrothal.
4. Games
a. The last and highest bid of a suit in one hand in bridge.
b. The number of tricks thus bid.
c. Contract bridge.
5. A paid assignment to murder someone: put out a contract on the mobster's life.
v. (kən-trăkt′, kŏn′trăkt′) con·tract·ed, con·tract·ing, con·tracts
v.tr.
1. To enter into by contract; establish or settle by formal agreement: contract a marriage.
2. To acquire or incur: contract obligations; contract a serious illness.
3.
a. To reduce in size by drawing together; shrink.
b. To pull together; wrinkle.
4. Grammar To shorten (a word or words) by omitting or combining some of the letters or sounds, as do not to don't.
v.intr.
1. To enter into or make an agreement: contract for garbage collection.
2. To become reduced in size by or as if by being drawn together: The pupils of the patient's eyes contracted.

[Middle English, from Latin contractus, past participle of contrahere, to draw together, make a contract : com-, com- + trahere, to draw.]

con·tract′i·bil′i·ty n.
con·tract′i·ble adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.contracted - reduced in size or pulled together; "the contracted pupils of her eyes"
expanded - increased in extent or size or bulk or scope
Translations

contracted

adjzusammengezogen; (Ling also) → verkürzt; browgerunzelt; (fig)engstirnig

contracted

n. contraído-a; retenido-a; infectado-a.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cows on a neighbouring farm in Tibberton were slaughtered on April 7 after they were found to have contracted foot and mouth but MAFF officials have twice given Mr Chilman's cattle a clean bill of health since then.
In the absence of any proper information rumours rapidly spread among parents that several children had contracted foot and mouth disease, the dreaded cattle virus which can prove fatal to livestock.