contrite


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con·trite

 (kən-trīt′, kŏn′trīt′)
adj.
1. Feeling regret and sorrow for one's sins or offenses; penitent.
2. Arising from or expressing contrition: contrite words.

[Middle English contrit, from Latin contrītus, past participle of conterere, to crush : com-, com- + terere, to grind; see terə- in Indo-European roots.]

con·trite′ly adv.
con·trite′ness n.

contrite

(kənˈtraɪt; ˈkɒntraɪt)
adj
1. full of guilt or regret; remorseful
2. arising from a sense of shame or guilt: contrite promises.
3. (Theology) Christianity remorseful for past sin and resolved to avoid future sin
[C14: from Latin contrītus worn out, from conterere to bruise, from terere to grind]
conˈtritely adv
conˈtriteness n

con•trite

(kənˈtraɪt, ˈkɒn traɪt)

adj.
1. caused by or showing sincere remorse.
2. filled with a sense of guilt and the desire for atonement; penitent: a contrite sinner.
[1300–50; Middle English contrit (< Anglo-French) < Latin contrītus worn down, crushed, past participle of conterere. See con-, trite]
con•trite′ly, adv.
con•trite′ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.contrite - feeling or expressing pain or sorrow for sins or offenses
penitent, repentant - feeling or expressing remorse for misdeeds

contrite

adjective sorry, humble, chastened, sorrowful, repentant, remorseful, regretful, penitent, conscience-stricken, in sackcloth and ashes He was so contrite that he wrote me a letter of apology.

contrite

adjective
1. Feeling or expressing regret for one's sins or misdeeds:
2. Expressing or inclined to express an apology:
Translations
نادِم
kajícný
brødebetynget
iîrandi
apgailestaujantisapgailestavimasatgailaatgailaujantis
nožēlas pilnssagrauzts
berouwmetrouwvol

contrite

[ˈkɒntraɪt] ADJarrepentido (Rel) → contrito

contrite

[kənˈtraɪt] adj [person] → contrit(e)

contrite

adj, contritely

contrite

[ˈkɒntraɪt] adjmortificato/a (Rel) → contrito/a

contrite

(ˈkontrait) adjective
deeply sorry for something one has done.
ˈcontriteness, contrition (kənˈtriʃən) noun
References in classic literature ?
As to all the rest, he was humble and contrite, and I never knew him complain.
What better can we do, then to the place Repairing where he judg'd us, prostrate fall Before him reverent, and there confess Humbly our faults, and pardon beg, with tears VVatering the ground, and with our sighs the Air Frequenting, sent from hearts contrite, in sign Of sorrow unfeign'd, and humiliation meek.
Therefore, sire, your Majesty sees that they are come, quite contrite and repentant, to offer you their excuses.
The fact was that the ivory hook of the parasol had caught in the chain gear, and when the first attempt at drawing water was made, the little offering of a contrite heart was jerked up, bent, its strong ribs jammed into the well side, and entangled with a twig root.
Papa said you would call,' continued he, after recovering a little from Catherine's embrace; while she stood by looking very contrite.
By the time they reached home she was contrite and spiritless.
It stood on a green hill, but of a green not of this world, and it was surrounded by massive walls and bastions to be stormed by no machines or engines of man's invention, but by prayer and fasting, by contrite sighs and by mortifications of the flesh.
He was instantly contrite, all soft humility, ears laid back with pleadingness for forgiveness and protestation of a warm throbbing heart of love.
Tonscience p'icked her," murmured a contrite voice from behind the small hands pressed tightly over Pokey's red face.
A contrite heart and ten nobles to holy mother Church may stave off perdition; but he hath a pardon of the first degree, with a twenty-five livre benison, so that I doubt if he will so much as feel a twinge of purgatory.
I was not really angry: I felt for him all the time, and longed to be reconciled; but I determined he should make the first advances, or at least show some signs of an humble and contrite spirit first; for, if I began, it would only minister to his self-conceit, increase his arrogance, and quite destroy the lesson I wanted to give him.
In that corner of the churchyard,' said the old gentleman, after a silence of a few moments, 'in that corner of the churchyard of which I have before spoken, there lies buried a man who was in my employment for three years after this event, and who was truly contrite, penitent, and humbled, if ever man was.