control stick


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control stick

n.
A lever used to control the motion of an aircraft by changing the angle of the elevators and ailerons.

control stick

n
(Aeronautics) the lever by which a pilot controls the lateral and longitudinal movements of an aircraft. Also called: control column or joy stick
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.control stick - a lever used by a pilot to control the ailerons and elevators of an airplanecontrol stick - a lever used by a pilot to control the ailerons and elevators of an airplane
lever - a rigid bar pivoted about a fulcrum
References in periodicals archive ?
Contract Awarded for Procurement of Spring Assemblies and Flight Control Stick
He yanked back on control stick and broke hard into the enemy.
In the moments following the start of the final approach, the cyclic control stick moved sharply forward and to the left.
But French investigators believe he tried to manually take charge of the Germanwings flight again, as the log showed movement of the Airbus' control stick.
Most planes would have been destroyed; Campbell switched into a mode only available in the A-10 manual reversion, where you fly the aircraft by brute force, manually pulling on cables when you move the control stick.
Without the need for any tools, the camera holder base and control stick mounts to 1" and 3/4" square tube stands as well as 1" and 3/4" round tube stands.
But he began acting erratically midway through the flight, moving to shut down the plane's engines and seizing the control stick, a spokesman for charter company Australia by Air told reporters.
This, it said, was caused by a digital SLR camera that had lodged between the captain's arm rest and the base of the control stick.
Despite flying as a passenger since being discharged, Jason is determined to get back behind the control stick quickly in the Cessna 172 plane he regularly flies from Liverpool John Lennon airport.
William received gifts from his colleagues when his last shift ended including a plinth-mounted cyclic control stick top, presented by AgustaWestland W shift engineering manager Stephen Sedgwick.
While still adjusting to being behind the control stick as he wears the goggles, Stewart said he is used to what he is seeing because of his time in the Navy.
When the control stick is centred or even released, the auto-braking will automatically stop the unit.