controvert

(redirected from controvertibly)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal.

con·tro·vert

 (kŏn′trə-vûrt′, kŏn′trə-vûrt′)
tr.v. con·tro·vert·ed, con·tro·vert·ing, con·tro·verts
To raise arguments against; voice opposition to.

[Back-formation from controversy.]

con′tro·vert′i·ble adj.

controvert

(ˈkɒntrəˌvɜːt; ˌkɒntrəˈvɜːt)
vb (tr)
1. to deny, refute, or oppose (some argument or opinion)
2. to argue or wrangle about
[C17: from Latin contrōversus; see controversy]
ˈcontroˌverter n
ˌcontroˈvertible adj
ˌcontroˈvertibly adv

con•tro•vert

(ˈkɒn trəˌvɜrt, ˌkɒn trəˈvɜrt)

v.t. -vert•ed, -vert•ing.
1. to argue against; dispute; deny; oppose.
2. to argue about; debate; discuss.
[1600–10; alter. of earlier controverse (< Latin contrōversus; see controversy) with -vert from advert1, convert, etc.]
con′tro•vert`er, n.
con`tro•vert′i•ble, adj.
con`tro•vert′i•bly, adv.

controvert


Past participle: controverted
Gerund: controverting

Imperative
controvert
controvert
Present
I controvert
you controvert
he/she/it controverts
we controvert
you controvert
they controvert
Preterite
I controverted
you controverted
he/she/it controverted
we controverted
you controverted
they controverted
Present Continuous
I am controverting
you are controverting
he/she/it is controverting
we are controverting
you are controverting
they are controverting
Present Perfect
I have controverted
you have controverted
he/she/it has controverted
we have controverted
you have controverted
they have controverted
Past Continuous
I was controverting
you were controverting
he/she/it was controverting
we were controverting
you were controverting
they were controverting
Past Perfect
I had controverted
you had controverted
he/she/it had controverted
we had controverted
you had controverted
they had controverted
Future
I will controvert
you will controvert
he/she/it will controvert
we will controvert
you will controvert
they will controvert
Future Perfect
I will have controverted
you will have controverted
he/she/it will have controverted
we will have controverted
you will have controverted
they will have controverted
Future Continuous
I will be controverting
you will be controverting
he/she/it will be controverting
we will be controverting
you will be controverting
they will be controverting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been controverting
you have been controverting
he/she/it has been controverting
we have been controverting
you have been controverting
they have been controverting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been controverting
you will have been controverting
he/she/it will have been controverting
we will have been controverting
you will have been controverting
they will have been controverting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been controverting
you had been controverting
he/she/it had been controverting
we had been controverting
you had been controverting
they had been controverting
Conditional
I would controvert
you would controvert
he/she/it would controvert
we would controvert
you would controvert
they would controvert
Past Conditional
I would have controverted
you would have controverted
he/she/it would have controverted
we would have controverted
you would have controverted
they would have controverted
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.controvert - be resistant to; "The board opposed his motion"
rebut, refute - overthrow by argument, evidence, or proof; "The speaker refuted his opponent's arguments"
negative, veto, blackball - vote against; refuse to endorse; refuse to assent; "The President vetoed the bill"
dissent, protest, resist - express opposition through action or words; "dissent to the laws of the country"
2.controvert - prove to be false or incorrect
confute, disprove - prove to be false; "The physicist disproved his colleagues' theories"

controvert

verb
To refuse to admit the truth, reality, value, or worth of:
Law: traverse.
Translations

controvert

[ˈkɒntrəvɜːt] VTcontradecir

controvert

vt (form)anfechten, bestreiten
References in periodicals archive ?
But more than this, if what I said in the preceding paragraphs is right (which, I think, it controvertibly is), then the original No Application Understanding did not, by itself, commit anyone to leaving states free to have racially segregated public schools.