contumacy


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con·tu·ma·cy

 (kŏn′to͞o-mə-sē, -tyo͞o-)
n. pl. con·tu·ma·cies
Obstinate or contemptuous resistance to authority; stubborn rebelliousness.

[Middle English contumacie, from Latin contumācia, from contumāx, contumāc-, insolent.]

contumacy

(ˈkɒntjʊməsɪ)
n, pl -cies
1. obstinate and wilful rebelliousness or resistance to authority; insubordination; disobedience
2. (Law) the wilful refusal of a person to appear before a court or to comply with a court order
[C14: from Latin contumācia, from contumāx obstinate; related to tumēre to swell, be proud]

con•tu•ma•cy

(ˈkɒn tʊ mə si, -tyʊ-)

n., pl. -cies.
stubborn rebelliousness; willful resistance or disobedience to authority.
[1150–1200; Middle English < Latin contumācia; see contumacious, -ia]

contumacy

a refusal to obey; defiance.
See also: Conflict
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.contumacy - willful refusal to appear before a court or comply with a court order; can result in a finding of contempt of court
disobedience, noncompliance - the failure to obey
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
2.contumacy - obstinate rebelliousness and insubordination; resistance to authority
insubordination, rebelliousness - an insubordinate act

contumacy

noun
The disposition boldly to defy or resist authority or an opposing force:
Translations

contumacy

[ˈkɒntjʊməsɪ] N (frm) → contumacia f

contumacy

n (form)Verstocktheit f; (= insubordination)Gehorsamsverweigerung f
References in classic literature ?
If she objects, tell her it is my particular wish; and if she resists, say I shall come and fetch her in case of contumacy.
Jansenius, who had been led by Miss Wilson to expect the utmost contumacy, looked to her in surprise.
At one moment there is to be a large army to lay prostrate the liberties of the people; at another moment the militia of Virginia are to be dragged from their homes five or six hundred miles, to tame the republican contumacy of Massachusetts; and that of Massachusetts is to be transported an equal distance to subdue the refractory haughtiness of the aristocratic Virginians.
We feel defrauded of the retribution due to evil acts, because the criminal adheres to his vice and contumacy and does not come to a crisis or judgment anywhere in visible nature.
Concluding the story of the legless beggar, Elia informs readers that the "House of Commons' committee" has investigated the man and that "he is expiating his contumacy in one of those houses (ironically christened) of Correction" (272, 271).