contumely


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal.
Related to contumely: quietus

con·tu·me·ly

 (kŏn′to͞o-mə-lē, -tyo͞o-, -təm-lē)
n. pl. con·tu·me·lies
1. Rudeness or contempt arising from arrogance; insolence.
2. An insolent or arrogant remark or act.

[Middle English contumelie, from Old French, from Latin contumēlia; akin to contumāx, insolent.]

con′tu·me′li·ous (kŏn′tə-mē′lē-əs) adj.
con′tu·me′li·ous·ly adv.

contumely

(ˈkɒntjʊmɪlɪ)
n, pl -lies
1. scornful or insulting language or behaviour
2. a humiliating or scornful insult
[C14: from Latin contumēlia invective, from tumēre to swell, as with wrath]
contumelious adj
ˌcontuˈmeliously adv
ˌcontuˈmeliousness n

con•tu•me•ly

(ˈkɒn tʊ mə li, -tyʊ-; kənˈtu mə li, -ˈtyu-)

n., pl. -lies.
1. insulting display of contempt in words or actions; contemptuous or humiliating treatment.
2. a humiliating insult.
[1350–1400; Middle English (< Anglo-French) < Latin contumēlia, perhaps akin to contumāx (see contumacious)]
con`tu•me′li•ous (-ˈmi li əs) adj.
con`tu•me′li•ous•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.contumely - a rude expression intended to offend or hurtcontumely - a rude expression intended to offend or hurt; "when a student made a stupid mistake he spared them no abuse"; "they yelled insults at the visiting team"
discourtesy, disrespect - an expression of lack of respect
low blow - unscrupulous abuse
billingsgate, scurrility - foul-mouthed or obscene abuse
stinger, cut - a remark capable of wounding mentally; "the unkindest cut of all"
invective, vituperation, vitriol - abusive or venomous language used to express blame or censure or bitter deep-seated ill will

contumely

noun
1. An act that offends a person's sense of pride or dignity:
Translations

contumely

[ˈkɒntjʊmɪlɪ] N (frm) → contumelia f

contumely

n no pl (form: = abuse) → Schmähen nt (geh); (= insult)Schmähung f (geh)
References in classic literature ?
Of an impulsive and passionate nature, she had fortified herself to encounter the stings and venomous stabs of public contumely, wreaking itself in every variety of insult; but there was a quality so much more terrible in the solemn mood of the popular mind, that she longed rather to behold all those rigid countenances contorted with scornful merriment, and herself the object.
Oh, well, yes; but it would try anybody to be doing the best he could, offering every kindness he could think of, only to have it rejected with contumely and .
Micawber's abilities, or receive the offer of them with contumely, what is the use of dwelling upon THAT idea?
And, adding a grievous contumely to the wrong already done us, the miscreant has now fallen asleep as quietly as if nothing were to be dreaded from our wrath
Ajax," replied Achilles, "noble son of Telamon, you have spoken much to my liking, but my blood boils when I think it all over, and remember how the son of Atreus treated me with contumely as though I were some vile tramp, and that too in the presence of the Argives.
Her sex once ascertained, their idolatry was changed into contempt and there was no end to the contumely showered upon her by the savages, who were exasperated at the deception which they conceived had been practised upon them.
I can bear Dishonour, public insult, many shames, Shrill scorn, and open contumely, but he Who filches from me something that is mine, Ay
Benjamin stared about him fiercely, and could he have found a single face that expressed contumely, he would have been prompt to quarrel with its owner; but meeting everywhere with looks of sobriety, and occasionally of commiseration, he very deliberately seated himself by the side of the hunter, and, placing his legs in the two vacant holes of the stocks, he said:
Perhishing gloomily, Spurred by contumely, Cold inhumanity, Burning insanity, Into her rest, -- Cross her hands humbly, As if praying dumbly, Over her breast
And as the contumely is greater towards God, so the danger is greater towards men.
What have I gained, that I no longer immolate a bull to Jove or to Neptune, or a mouse to Hecate; that I do not tremble before the Eumenides, or the Catholic Purgatory, or the Calvinistic Judgment-day,--if I quake at opinion, the public opinion, as we call it; or at the threat of assault, or contumely, or bad neighbors, or poverty, or mutilation, or at the rumor of revolution, or of murder?
He lived in Dickens in a measure that I have never known another to do, and my contumely must have brought him a pang that was truly a personal grief.