convention


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con·ven·tion

 (kən-vĕn′shən)
n.
1.
a. A formal meeting of members, representatives, or delegates, as of a political party, fraternal society, profession, or industry.
b. The body of persons attending such an assembly: called the convention to order.
2. An agreement between states, sides, or military forces, especially an international agreement dealing with a specific subject, such as the treatment of prisoners of war.
3. General agreement on or acceptance of certain practices or attitudes: By convention, north is at the top of most maps.
4. A practice or procedure widely observed in a group, especially to facilitate social interaction; a custom: the convention of shaking hands.
5. A widely used and accepted device or technique, as in drama, literature, or painting: the theatrical convention of the aside.

[Middle English convencioun, from Latin conventiō, conventiōn-, meeting, from conventus, past participle of convenīre, to assemble; see convene.]

convention

(kənˈvɛnʃən)
n
1.
a. a large formal assembly of a group with common interests, such as a political party or trade union
b. the persons attending such an assembly
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) politics US an assembly of delegates of one party to select candidates for office
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) diplomacy an international agreement second only to a treaty in formality: a telecommunications convention.
4. any agreement, compact, or contract
5. the most widely accepted or established view of what is thought to be proper behaviour, good taste, etc
6. an accepted rule, usage, etc: a convention used by printers.
7. (Bridge) bridge Also called: conventional a bid or play not to be taken at its face value, which one's partner can interpret according to a prearranged bidding system
[C15: from Latin conventiō an assembling, agreeing]

con•ven•tion

(kənˈvɛn ʃən)

n.
1. a meeting or formal assembly, as of members or delegates, to discuss or act on matters of common concern.
2. an assembly of delegates of a political party to nominate candidates and adopt platforms and party rules.
3. an agreement or contract; compact.
4. an international agreement, esp. one dealing with a specific matter.
5. a rule, method, or practice established by usage; custom: the convention of showing north at the top of a map.
6. general agreement or consent; accepted usage, esp. as a standard of procedure.
7. a bid or play in bridge that allows partners to convey information about their hands according to a prearranged system.
[1375–1425; late Middle English (< Middle French) < Latin conventiō assembly, agreement. See convene, -tion]
syn: convention, assembly, conference, convocation refer to meetings for particular purposes. convention usu. suggests a formal meeting of members or delegates, as of a professional group: an annual medical convention. assembly usu. implies a regular meeting for a customary purpose: an assembly of legislators; a school assembly in the auditorium. conference suggests a meeting for consultation or discussion: a sales conference. convocation usu. refers to an ecclesiastical or academic meeting whose participants were summoned: a convocation of experts.

Convention

 an assembly, especially a meeting of representatives of some profession, society, or religious political organization, 1552. See also congress.
Examples: convention of estates, 1651; of islands, 1651; of exquisite lineaments, 1592; for prayer, 1649.

convention

A meeting of members of a political party, especially of delegates to choose candidates for an election.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.convention - a large formal assemblyconvention - a large formal assembly; "political convention"
group meeting, meeting - a formally arranged gathering; "next year the meeting will be in Chicago"; "the meeting elected a chairperson"
Constitutional Convention - the convention of United States statesmen who drafted the United States Constitution in 1787
2.convention - something regarded as a normative exampleconvention - something regarded as a normative example; "the convention of not naming the main character"; "violence is the rule not the exception"; "his formula for impressing visitors"
practice - knowledge of how something is usually done; "it is not the local practice to wear shorts to dinner"
mores - (sociology) the conventions that embody the fundamental values of a group
code of behavior, code of conduct - a set of conventional principles and expectations that are considered binding on any person who is a member of a particular group
universal - a behavioral convention or pattern characteristic of all members of a particular culture or of all human beings; "some form of religion seems to be a human universal"
3.convention - (diplomacy) an international agreement
pact, treaty, accord - a written agreement between two states or sovereigns
diplomacy, diplomatic negotiations - negotiation between nations
4.convention - orthodoxy as a consequence of being conventional
orthodoxy - the quality of being orthodox (especially in religion)
ossification, conformity - hardened conventionality
5.convention - the act of convening
gathering, assemblage, assembly - the social act of assembling; "they demanded the right of assembly"

convention

noun
1. custom, practice, tradition, code, usage, protocol, formality, etiquette, propriety It's just a social convention that men don't wear skirts.
2. agreement, contract, treaty, bargain, pact, compact, protocol, stipulation, concordat the importance of observing the Geneva convention on human rights
3. assembly, meeting, council, conference, congress, convocation I flew to Boston to attend the annual convention of the Parapsychological Association.

convention

noun
1. A formal assemblage of the members of a group:
2. A number of persons who have come or been gathered together:
Informal: get-together.
3. A legally binding arrangement between parties:
4. A formal, usually written settlement between nations:
5. An accepted way of doing something:
Translations
إِجْتـِماع أو مُؤْتَمر وَطـنـيعُرْف، تَقليدمَجلِس
konvencepředvolební sjezdschůzesjezdspolečenská zvyklost
kongreskonventmødesædvane
käytäntökokoontuminenkonventio
egyezményillemszabályok
ráîstefnasiîvenja; viîtekin regla
elgesio normaįprastinisįprastumasįsigalėjusi nuostatakonvencija
konvencijaparažasanāksmesapulce
konvencia

convention

[kənˈvenʃən] N
1. (= custom) → convención f
you must follow conventionhay que seguir los convencionalismos
2. (= meeting) → asamblea f, congreso m
3. (= agreement) → convenio m, convención f

convention

[kənˈvɛnʃən] n
(= custom) → convention f
(= meeting) → convention f
(= agreement) → convention f

convention

n
Brauch m, → Sitte f; (= social rule)Konvention f; convention requires or demands that …die Sitte or der Brauch will es so, dass …; it’s a convention that …es ist so üblich or Sitte or Brauch, dass …; it’s a social conventiones ist gesellschaftlich der Brauch; (= point of etiquette)es ist eine gesellschaftliche Konvention; a disregard for conventioneine Missachtung der Konventionen
(= agreement)Abkommen nt
(= conference)Tagung f, → Konferenz f; (Pol) → Versammlung f

convention

[kənˈvɛnʃn] n (custom, agreement) → convenzione f; (meeting) → congresso, convegno

convention

(kənˈvenʃən) noun
1. a way of behaving that has become usual; (an) established custom. Shaking hands when meeting people is a normal convention in many countries; He does not care about convention.
2. in the United States a meeting of delegates from a political party for nominating a presidential candidate.
3. an assembly of people of a particular profession etc.
conˈventional adjective
(negative unconventional) according to the accepted standards etc; not outrageous or eccentric. conventional dress; the more conventional forms of art.
conˌventioˈnality (-ˈnӕ-) noun
References in classic literature ?
Concerning the Difficulties of the Convention in Devising a Proper Form of Government From the Daily Advertiser.
But as the ultimate object of these papers is to determine clearly and fully the merits of this Constitution, and the expediency of adopting it, our plan cannot be complete without taking a more critical and thorough survey of the work of the convention, without examining it on all its sides, comparing it in all its parts, and calculating its probable effects.
To those who have been led by experience to attend to this consideration, it could not appear surprising, that the act of the convention, which recommends so many important changes and innovations, which may be viewed in so many lights and relations, and which touches the springs of so many passions and interests, should find or excite dispositions unfriendly, both on one side and on the other, to a fair discussion and accurate judgment of its merits.
Still continuing no less attached to union than enamored of liberty, they observed the danger which immediately threatened the former and more remotely the latter; and being pursuaded that ample security for both could only be found in a national government more wisely framed, they as with one voice, convened the late convention at Philadelphia, to take that important subject under consideration.
This convention composed of men who possessed the confidence of the people, and many of whom had become highly distinguished by their patriotism, virtue and wisdom, in times which tried the minds and hearts of men, undertook the arduous task.
But if the people at large had reason to confide in the men of that Congress, few of whom had been fully tried or generally known, still greater reason have they now to respect the judgment and advice of the convention, for it is well known that some of the most distinguished members of that Congress, who have been since tried and justly approved for patriotism and abilities, and who have grown old in acquiring political information, were also members of this convention, and carried into it their accumulated knowledge and experience.
WHILE the Owner of a Silver Mine was on his way to attend a convention of his species he was accosted by a Jackass, who said:
And making this concession, I affirm that (with the sole exception of duties on imports and exports) they would, under the plan of the convention, retain that authority in the most absolute and unqualified sense; and that an attempt on the part of the national government to abridge them in the exercise of it, would be a violent assumption of power, unwarranted by any article or clause of its Constitution.
But as the plan of the convention aims only at a partial union or consolidation, the State governments would clearly retain all the rights of sovereignty which they before had, and which were not, by that act, EXCLUSIVELY delegated to the United States.
Their theory, suitable for primitive and peaceful periods of history, has the inconvenience- in application to complex and stormy periods in the life of nations during which various powers arise simultaneously and struggle with one another- that a Legitimist historian will prove that the National Convention, the Directory, and Bonaparte were mere infringers of the true power, while a Republican and a Bonapartist will prove: the one that the Convention and the other that the Empire was the real power, and that all the others were violations of power.
Equally little does this view explain why for several centuries the collective will is not withdrawn from certain rulers and their heirs, and then suddenly during a period of fifty years is transferred to the Convention, to the Directory, to Napoleon, to Alexander, to Louis XVIII, to Napoleon again, to Charles X, to Louis Philippe, to a Republican government, and to Napoleon III.
It is not difficult to stand above the conventions when we leave no hostages among them; men can always be more unconventional than women, and a bachelor of independent means need encounter no difficulties at all.