conventionalism


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Related to conventionalism: conventionalist

con·ven·tion·al

 (kən-vĕn′shə-nəl)
adj.
1. Based on or in accordance with general agreement, use, or practice; customary: conventional symbols; a conventional form of address.
2. Conforming to established practice or accepted standards; traditional: a conventional church wedding.
3.
a. Devoted to or bound by conventions to the point of artificiality; ceremonious.
b. Unimaginative; conformist: longed to escape from their conventional, bourgeois lives.
4. Represented, as in a work of art, in simplified or abstract form.
5. Law Based on consent or agreement; contractual.
6. Of, relating to, or resembling an assembly.
7. Using means other than nuclear weapons or energy: conventional warfare; conventional power plants.

con·ven′tion·al·ism n.
con·ven′tion·al·ist n.
con·ven′tion·al·ly adv.

conventionalism

(kənˈvɛnʃənəˌlɪzəm)
n
1. advocacy of or conformity to that which is established
2. something conventional
3. (Philosophy) philosophy a theory that moral principles are not enshrined in the nature of things but merely reflect customary practice
4. (Philosophy) philosophy the theory that meaning is a matter of convention and thus that scientific laws merely reflect such general linguistic agreement
conˈventionalist n

conventionalism

a variety of conduct and thought based solely upon the usages, opinions, and practices of one’s own society. — conventionalist, n.
See also: Attitudes
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.conventionalism - orthodoxy as a consequence of being conventional
orthodoxy - the quality of being orthodox (especially in religion)
ossification, conformity - hardened conventionality
Translations

conventionalism

[kənˈvenʃənəlɪzəm] Nconvencionalismo m
References in classic literature ?
The worthy magistrate who had been conversant with all degrees and qualities of mankind, could not but perceive every motion and gesture of the distinguished Feathertop came in its proper place; nothing had been left rude or native in him; a well-digested conventionalism had incorporated itself thoroughly with his substance and transformed him into a work of art.
While Fauser describes some overtly patriotic works as mired in conventionalism and "propagandist surface Americana" (p.
See Andrei Marmor, Legal Conventionalism, in Hart's Postscript, supra note 19, at 193, 215.
Syed Mazhar Hussain said that PTCL is cognizant of the changing landscape of telecom industry and continues to promote divergent and non-linear thinking for driving innovation, escaping conventionalism, creating strategic roadmaps, and envisioning the future.
It seems to animate Ray's works with a stoic indifference to the conventionalism that rules our cultural theory as much as our inflationary markets.
Fontane concentrated on social conventionalism against emotion and reason, but at the same time and in a latent way, transgression and desire become primary motives.
Natural law opposes the ideas of conventionalism and positivism to the effect that the principles of morality are relative, subjective, and changeable.
The problem with such a view is that it posits law as a metaphysical concept with an enduring and unchangeable essential commitment to conventionalism.
In this form, for a large part of the narrative, it also functions as the seemingly more authentic alternative to the decadent conventionalism of the Durvasapura brahmins.
But if they are supposed to show what's wrong with conventionalism from the perspective of intuitionism, then perhaps more charitable evaluations are possible.
The British society is frequently claimed to be a culture based on traditionalism and conventionalism.
Caring solely for "those that try anything once" while condoning those settle for complacency and conventionalism, Casablancas rages, "You're living a lie.