conventional

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con·ven·tion·al

 (kən-vĕn′shə-nəl)
adj.
1. Based on or in accordance with general agreement, use, or practice; customary: conventional symbols; a conventional form of address.
2. Conforming to established practice or accepted standards; traditional: a conventional church wedding.
3.
a. Devoted to or bound by conventions to the point of artificiality; ceremonious.
b. Unimaginative; conformist: longed to escape from their conventional, bourgeois lives.
4. Represented, as in a work of art, in simplified or abstract form.
5. Law Based on consent or agreement; contractual.
6. Of, relating to, or resembling an assembly.
7. Using means other than nuclear weapons or energy: conventional warfare; conventional power plants.

con·ven′tion·al·ism n.
con·ven′tion·al·ist n.
con·ven′tion·al·ly adv.

conventional

(kənˈvɛnʃənəl)
adj
1. following the accepted customs and proprieties, esp in a way that lacks originality: conventional habits.
2. established by accepted usage or general agreement
3. of or relating to a convention or assembly
4. (Law) law based upon the agreement or consent of parties
5. (Art Terms) arts represented in a simplified or generalized way; conventionalized
6. (Military) (of weapons, warfare, etc) not nuclear
n
(Bridge) bridge another word for convention7
conˈventionally adv

con•ven•tion•al

(kənˈvɛn ʃə nl)

adj.
1. conforming or adhering to accepted standards, as of conduct or taste.
2. pertaining to or established by general consent or accepted usage: conventional symbols.
3. ordinary rather than different or original.
4. not using nuclear weapons or energy: conventional weapons; conventional warfare.
5. in accordance with an accepted manner, model, or tradition in art.
6. of or pertaining to a compact or convention.
7. of or pertaining to a convention or assembly.
[1575–85; < Late Latin]
con•ven′tion•al•ism, n.
con•ven′tion•al•ist, n.
con•ven′tion•al•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.conventional - following accepted customs and proprieties; "conventional wisdom"; "she had strayed from the path of conventional behavior"; "conventional forms of address"
formal - being in accord with established forms and conventions and requirements (as e.g. of formal dress); "pay one's formal respects"; "formal dress"; "a formal ball"; "the requirement was only formal and often ignored"; "a formal education"
unoriginal - not original; not being or productive of something fresh and unusual; "the manuscript contained unoriginal emendations"; "his life had been unoriginal, conforming completely to the given pattern"- Gwethalyn Graham
unconventional - not conforming to accepted rules or standards; "her unconventional dress and hair style"
unconventional - not conventional or conformist; "unconventional life styles"
2.conventional - conforming with accepted standards; "a conventional view of the world"
orthodox - adhering to what is commonly accepted; "an orthodox view of the world"
3.conventional - (weapons) using energy for propulsion or destruction that is not nuclear energy; "conventional warfare"; "conventional weapons"
nuclear, atomic - (weapons) deriving destructive energy from the release of atomic energy; "nuclear war"; "nuclear weapons"; "atomic bombs"
4.conventional - unimaginative and conformist; "conventional bourgeois lives"; "conventional attitudes"
unconventional - not conventional or conformist; "unconventional life styles"
5.conventional - represented in simplified or symbolic form
beaux arts, fine arts - the study and creation of visual works of art
nonrepresentational - of or relating to a style of art in which objects do not resemble those known in physical nature
6.conventional - in accord with or being a tradition or practice accepted from the past; "a conventional church wedding with the bride in traditional white"; "the conventional handshake"
traditional - consisting of or derived from tradition; "traditional history"; "traditional morality"
7.conventional - rigidly formal or bound by convention; "their ceremonious greetings did not seem heartfelt"
formal - being in accord with established forms and conventions and requirements (as e.g. of formal dress); "pay one's formal respects"; "formal dress"; "a formal ball"; "the requirement was only formal and often ignored"; "a formal education"

conventional

adjective
1. proper, conservative, correct, formal, respectable, bourgeois, genteel, staid, conformist, decorous, Pooterish a respectable married woman with conventional opinions
2. ordinary, standard, normal, regular, usual, vanilla (slang), habitual, bog-standard (Brit. & Irish slang), common the cost of fuel and electricity used by a conventional system
3. traditional, accepted, prevailing, orthodox, customary, prevalent, hidebound, wonted The conventional wisdom on these matters is being challenged.
4. unoriginal, routine, stereotyped, pedestrian, commonplace, banal, prosaic, run-of-the-mill, hackneyed, vanilla (slang) This is a rather conventional work by a mediocre author.
unoriginal abnormal, uncommon, unconventional, off-the-wall (slang), unorthodox, left-field (informal)

conventional

adjective
1. Generally approved or agreed upon:
2. Conforming to established practice or standards:
Slang: square.
3. Fond of or given to ceremony:
Translations
تَقْليديتَقْلِيديّ
konvenční
konventioneltraditionel
sovinnainen
konvencionalan
viîtekinn, venjulegur
慣例にのっとった
재래식인
konvenčný
konventionell
เกี่ยวกับประเพณีนิยม
theo tập quán thông thường

conventional

[kənˈvenʃənl] ADJ [behaviour, tastes, weapons, method] → convencional; [person] → tradicional, convencional; [belief, values] → tradicional; [style, clothes] → clásico, tradicional
conventional medicinela medicina tradicional or convencional
she was not beautiful in the conventional sense of the wordno era una belleza en el sentido generalmente aceptado de la palabra
conventional wisdom (frm) → la opinión convencional

conventional

[kənˈvɛnʃənəl] adj [behaviour, opinion] → conventionnel(le); [method, product] → conventionnel(le) conventional weapons

conventional

adj dress, attitudes, warfare, weaponskonventionell; person, behaviour alsokonventionsgebunden; philosophy, beliefs, theory, manner, techniqueherkömmlich; theatre, music, styletraditionell; symbol, mealtimesnormalerweise üblich; it is conventional to do somethinges ist normalerweise üblich, etw zu tun; conventional medicinekonventionelle Medizin; in the conventional senseim herkömmlichen Sinn

conventional

[kənˈvɛnʃənl] adj (person, style, weapons) → convenzionale; (methods) → tradizionale

convention

(kənˈvenʃən) noun
1. a way of behaving that has become usual; (an) established custom. Shaking hands when meeting people is a normal convention in many countries; He does not care about convention.
2. in the United States a meeting of delegates from a political party for nominating a presidential candidate.
3. an assembly of people of a particular profession etc.
conˈventional adjective
(negative unconventional) according to the accepted standards etc; not outrageous or eccentric. conventional dress; the more conventional forms of art.
conˌventioˈnality (-ˈnӕ-) noun

conventional

تَقْلِيديّ konvenční konventionel traditionell συμβατικός convencional sovinnainen conventionnel konvencionalan convenzionale 慣例にのっとった 재래식인 conventioneel konvensjonell konwencjonalny convencional обычный konventionell เกี่ยวกับประเพณีนิยม geleneksel theo tập quán thông thường 常规的

conventional

adj convencional
References in classic literature ?
He resembles the old Conventionalist of '93, who said to Napoleon, in 1814, `You bend because your empire is a young stem, weakened by rapid growth.
To conventionalists like the author, the immediate cause is presumably incompetent experimental technique.
I fear that the body-mind is more subtle and complex than we conventionalists were trained to believe.
The conventionalists wanted "bunker buster" bombs, or torpedoes fired into the pipe.
These Conventionalists are introverted, the least adventurous and describe themselves as homebodies.
Conventionalists claim that the criteria used to evaluate theories are merely agreed-upon conventions.
What is really at issue between conventionalists and non-conventionalists is whether the basic moral relation of promissory commitment derives from the moral principles that govern our use of social conventions.
Conventionalists see ethics as a piece of artifice; given that values and principles are artificial constructs (rather than handed down by divine command or written into the fabric of the universe), they are themselves pieces of technology that can be engineered to better suit human needs.
When Lovecraft's protagonists recoil from the terrible truths they have stumbled upon, they stand for the affronted conventionalists and religious believers who still balk at the revelations of Charles Darwin and Sigmund Freud.
He lures the future subjects (eccentrics, stuffy conventionalists, and decadents) of his works in a heartless, perfunctory manner, gaining their trust and friendship with a display of false sympathy.