conversable

conversable

(kənˈvɜːsəbəl)
adj
1. easy or pleasant to talk to
2. able or inclined to talk
conˈversableness n
conˈversably adv

con•vers•a•ble

(kənˈvɜr sə bəl)

adj.
1. easy and pleasant to talk with; agreeable.
2. able or disposed to converse.
[1590–1600; < Medieval Latin]
con•vers′a•ble•ness, n.
con•vers′a•bly, adv.
References in classic literature ?
Here are you and I, who consider ourselves twice as presentable and conversable as she, two old maids.
If you would try to amuse Miss Matilda yourself a little more, I think she would not be driven to seek amusement in the companionship of dogs and horses and grooms, so much as she is; and if you would be a little more cheerful and conversable with Miss Murray, she would not so often go wandering in the fields with a book in her hand.
On the other hand, Miss Wilson was as affable and courteous as heart could wish, and though I was in no very conversable humour myself, the two ladies between them managed to keep up a pretty continuous fire of small talk.
Bardell let lodgings to many conversable single gentlemen, with great profit, but never brought any more actions for breach of promise of marriage.
The conversable world has been shredded and the dominant paradigm in global politics is monologic.
As economist Timothy Taylor points out on his Conversable Economist blog, the text could have been plucked from this week's issue of the magazine.
Conversable Worlds: Literature, Contention and Community 1762 to 1830.
Furthermore, if Darcy is only conversable, as Wickham states, when "he thinks it worth his while," then how do we account for Darcy's befriending and traveling around with Charles Bingley, who is neither a member of the landed gentry (not an estate owner), nor even half as rich as Darcy (Bingley's worth is 4,000 [pounds sterling] per annum), nor from "ancient" or "noble" families, as Lady Catherine reminds Elizabeth that Darcy is (356).
At the same time, Robert loved some aspects of the old ways: he knew how to order a dinner, he was eminently conversable (indeed, in his genius for friendship, he was the least boring person who ever existed), he abhorred unkindness and bad manners, and he loved great literature.
Robert Burt's Death is that Man Taking Names, William May's The Patient's Ordeal, and Thomas Murray's The Worth of a Child are provocative, clear, and conversable.
Students of the Renaissance may also want to read later chapters in the sections "Learned and conversable reading" on the long eighteenth century and "Publication in the age of science" on the first half of the nineteenth.