conversion disorder


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conversion disorder

n.
A psychiatric disorder characterized by the presence of symptoms, such as paralysis, tremor, or visual or auditory problems, that resemble those of nervous system dysfunction but cannot be explained by a neurological disorder. Development of the disorder is often associated with psychological stress or trauma. Also called conversion reaction, functional neurological symptom disorder.

conversion disorder

n
(Pathology) a psychological disorder in which severe physical symptoms like blindness or paralysis appear with no apparent physical cause
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.conversion disorder - a mental disorder characterized by the conversion of mental conflict into somatic forms (into paralysis or anesthesia having no apparent cause)
folie, mental disorder, mental disturbance, psychological disorder, disturbance - (psychiatry) a psychological disorder of thought or emotion; a more neutral term than mental illness
glove anesthesia - a mental disorder involving loss of sensitivity in the hand and wrist; "since no combination of nerves serve this area a glove anesthesia is clearly psychogenic in origin"
References in periodicals archive ?
Recently, hysteria has surfaced onscreen in films including Alice Winocour's Augustine (2012), David Cronenberg's A Dangerous Method (2011), and Tanya Wexler's Hysteria (2011); onstage in Sarah Ruhl's 2009 Pulitzer-nominated In the Next Room (or The Vibrator Play) and a 2013 London revival of Terry Johnson's Hysteria, first produced in 1993 (Spencer); in the widespread media coverage of a late 2012 outbreak of mass conversion disorder among female high school students in Le Roy, New York (Dominus); and in an Amazon-produced television series inspired by the Le Roy case--Hysteria (2014)--which premiered, auspiciously, as the editors were compiling this issue.
In dissociative disorder which occurs in relation with trauma, conversion disorder and conversive fainting are also observed frequently.
After the Golden Age, other "spectacular" syndromes depicted in mental health pictures and popular genres included: conversion disorder ("Freud," 1962); multiple personality disorder ("The Three Faces of Eve," 1957); dissociative disorder ("The Swimmer, 1968"); erotomania/de Clerambault's syndrome ("Fatal Attraction," 1987; "The Story of Adele H," 1975); alcoholic hallucinosis and delirium tremens ("The Lost Weekend," 1945); acute schizophrenia ("The Snake Pit," 1948); and compulsive gambling ("The Lady Gambles," 1949; "California Split," 1974).
18] The prominence of psychiatric symptoms often leads to a misdiagnosis of conversion disorder.
The IPC said it was only in late 2012 that doctors diagnosed the cyclist with Conversion Disorder -- a psychiatric condition that can cause neurological symptoms such as numbness, blindness, paralysis or fits without any apparent organic cause.
While partial seizures and complicated migraine are the most common and important TIA/stroke mimics, on occasion panic attacks, conversion disorder, vertigo, and syncope can also be confused with TIA.
Comparing symptoms conveyed by conversion disorder patients and those produced by "paralysis" suggestions in hypnosis, also revealed similar patterns of brain activation associated with attempted movement of the affected limb.
Some doctors believed they were victims of conversion disorder, where real physical symptoms - in this case tics - are triggered not by a physical cause, but by psychological trauma.
But all the tests came back normal, and doctors now say the students are most likely suffering from conversion disorder - a type of mass hysteria.
Beyond "somatoform disorder," the medical terms with somatoform components include, but are by no means limited to, conversion disorder, (28) psychosomatic disorder, (29) psychophysiologic disorder, (30) psychogenic disorder, (31) pseudoneurological disorder, (32) and hysteria.
Possible psychological mechanisms underlying these phenomena are then discussed, with particular emphasis on the nature of compartmentalization in conversion disorder, hypnosis, dissociative amnesia and dissociative identity disorder.
Conversion disorder presents with sensory and/or motor impairments suggesting neurological or medical conditions, but without substantiated organic evidence (Miller 2002).