convertite


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convertite

(ˈkɒnvəˌtaɪt)
n
archaic a convert, esp a reformed prostitute
References in periodicals archive ?
Este superficial daca poate fi gasit un "numitor comun" in care valorile sa poata fi convertite.
Maddalena delle Convertite around 1622, forms the nexus for Jones's next study.
Hotel Parlamento - Via delle Convertite 5, Rome Centrally located near the Spanish Steps, this comfortable hotel is $153/night.
Such institutions for women, like the Zitelle, the Convertite, and the Dimesse, become objects of study as the economic transformations of the city give way to unforeseen alterations of its social fabric.
Blume, "Botticelli's Commission for Sant'Elisabetta delle Convertite and Courtauld Trinity"; Kathleen Wren Christian, "Petratch's Triumph of Chastity in Leonardo's Lady with an Ermine"; Giovanna Galante Garrone, "From Southwest Piedmont: A Fragment by Hans Clemer"; Christa Gardner Von, "Light on the Cross: Cardinal Pedro Gonzalez de Mendoza and Antoniazzo Romano in Teuffel, Sta.
After a valuable survey in chapter one of women's institutions across Renaissance Italy, the author in chapter two zeroes in on the Nunnery of the Convertite (or converted former prostitutes, founded 1332), on the secular House for immoral or Badly-Behaving Wives (Malmaritate) (1579), both in Florence, and on the Pistoian house of Santa Mari Maddalena (1604), also for former prostitutes.
55) The Espositioni, written for a group of convertite (penitent prostitutes) in Bergamo and Rome, explain liturgical texts.
San Zuan on Torcello was a special monastery for the convertite, that is, those women who had turned away from a life of prostitution.
The many other references to zoccoli or chopines include Casola, 144; Coryat, 262; Barzaghi cites Garzoni's description of women parading through Piazza San Marco as "nane convertite in gigantesche" (100).