conviction


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Related to conviction: lack conviction

con·vic·tion

 (kən-vĭk′shən)
n.
1. Law
a. The judgment of a jury or judge that a person is guilty of a crime as charged.
b. The state of being found or proved guilty: evidence that led to the suspect's conviction.
2.
a. The act or process of convincing.
b. The state or appearance of being convinced: She spoke with real conviction on the matter.
3. A fixed or strong belief. See Synonyms at view.

con·vic′tion·al adj.

conviction

(kənˈvɪkʃən)
n
1. the state or appearance of being convinced
2. a fixed or firmly held belief, opinion, etc
3. the act of convincing
4. (Law) the act or an instance of convicting or the state of being convicted
5. carry conviction to be convincing
conˈvictional adj

con•vic•tion

(kənˈvɪk ʃən)

n.
1. a fixed or firm belief.
2. the act of convicting.
3. the state of being convicted.
4. the state of being convinced.
5. the act of convincing.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Late Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.conviction - an unshakable belief in something without need for proof or evidence
belief - any cognitive content held as true
amateurism - the conviction that people should participate in sports as a hobby (for the fun of it) rather than for money
2.conviction - (criminal law) a final judgment of guilty in a criminal case and the punishment that is imposed; "the conviction came as no surprise"
final decision, final judgment - a judgment disposing of the case before the court; after the judgment (or an appeal from it) is rendered all that remains is to enforce the judgment
murder conviction - conviction for murder
rape conviction - conviction for rape
robbery conviction - conviction for robbery
criminal law - the body of law dealing with crimes and their punishment
acquittal - a judgment of not guilty

conviction

noun
1. belief, view, opinion, principle, faith, persuasion, creed, tenet Their religious convictions prevented them from taking up arms.
2. certainty, confidence, assurance, fervour, firmness, earnestness, certitude He preaches with conviction.
3. sentence, ruling, decision, verdict, judgment, punishment, decree, condemnation, pronouncement He will appeal against the conviction.

conviction

noun
1. The fact or condition of being without doubt:
2. Something believed or accepted as true by a person:
Translations
إِدانَه، تَجْـريمإِقْتِنـاع
odsouzenípřesvědčení
domfast trooverbevisning
meggyőződés
sakfelling, dómursannfæring
presvedčenie
obsodbaprepričanje
inançinanışkanaatmahkûmiyetsuçlu bul ma

conviction

[kənˈvɪkʃən] N
1. (Jur) → condena f
there were 12 convictions for thefthubo 12 condenas por robo
to have no previous convictionsno tener antecedentes penales
2. (= belief) → convicción f, creencia f
it is my conviction thatcreo firmemente que ...
3. (= persuasion, persuasiveness) he said with convictiondijo con convicción
without much convictionno muy convencido
to carry convictionser convincente
open to convictiondispuesto a dejarse convencer

conviction

[kənˈvɪkʃən] n
[defendant] → condamnation f
(= belief) → conviction f
with conviction → avec conviction
to carry conviction → être convaincant(e)

conviction

n
(Jur) → Verurteilung f; five previous convictionsfünf Vorstrafen; to get a conviction (police, prosecution)einen Schuldspruch erreichen
(= belief, act of convincing)Überzeugung f; to be open to convictionsich gern eines Besseren belehren lassen; to carry convictionüberzeugend klingen; his speech lacked convictionseine Rede klang wenig überzeugend; he’s a socialist by convictioner ist ein überzeugter Sozialist; he did it in the conviction that …er tat es in der Überzeugung, dass …; a man of strong convictionsein Mann, der feste Anschauungen vertritt; his fundamental political/moral convictionsseine politische/moralische Gesinnung ? courage

conviction

[kənˈvɪkʃn] n
a. (belief) → convinzione f
it is my conviction that → sono convinto che
to carry conviction → essere convincente
b. (Law) → condanna

convict

(kənˈvikt) verb
to prove or declare (someone) guilty. She was convicted of theft.
(ˈkonvikt) noun
a person serving a sentence for a crime. Two of the convicts have escaped from prison.
conˈviction (-ʃən) noun
1. the passing of a sentence on a guilty person. She has had two convictions for drunken driving.
2. (a) strong belief. It's my conviction that he's right.
References in classic literature ?
Teddy is a remarkable boy, and can't be taken as a sample of other boys," said Amy, in a tone of solemn conviction, which would have convulsed the `remarkable boy' if he had heard it.
Into his mind came the conviction that he was walking and running in some terrible void where no one had ever been be- fore.
When Edna awoke it was with the conviction that she had slept long and soundly.
Each moment, however, pressed upon him a conviction of the critical situation in which he had suffered his invaluable trust to be involved through his own confidence.
Kearney," she said dryly, "one would think that some silly, conceited girl"--she was quite earnest in her epithets, for a sudden, angry conviction of some coquetry and disingenuousness in Jessie had come to her in contemplating its effects upon the young fellow at her side--"some country jilt, had been trying her rustic hand upon you.
There is a conviction within me that the end draws nigh.
There was no ambiguity in anything; none whatever, at least, in the conviction I from one moment to another found myself forming as to what I should see straight before me and across the lake as a consequence of raising my eyes.
That he never read the Bible; never went to church; that he jested and made free with any and every thing that came in the way of his wit; that he spent his Sunday evenings at the opera or theatre; that he went to wine parties, and clubs, and suppers, oftener than was at all expedient,--were all things that Tom could see as plainly as anybody, and on which he based a conviction that "Mas'r wasn't a Christian;"--a conviction, however, which he would have been very slow to express to any one else, but on which he founded many prayers, in his own simple fashion, when he was by himself in his little dormitory.
That was the half- conviction that when the nature of my proposed calamity should be reported to those superstitious people, it would have such an effect that they would want to compromise.
We found an old road, and it proved eventually to be the right one, though we followed it at the time with the conviction that it was the wrong one.
Her voice, her eyes, her body breathed conviction, earnestness, emotion; and when she left the platform the audience felt that they had listened to a masterpiece.
At first, he could give no encourage- ment; with unfeigned diffidence, he expressed his conviction that he was not adequate to the perform- ance of so great a task; the path marked out was wholly an untrodden one; he was sincerely appre- hensive that he should do more harm than good.