convictive

con·vic·tive

 (kən-vĭk′tĭv)
adj.
Having power or serving to convince or convict.

con·vic′tive·ly adv.

convictive

(kənˈvɪktɪv)
adj
able or serving to convince or convict
conˈvictively adv
References in periodicals archive ?
A chance of local convictive clouds formation northward and eastward of the country by afternoon.
Clouds amount increases gradually, may associate with rainy convictive clouds especially over islands and some northern and eastern areas.
We believe our conclusion may be more convictive if a large scale clinical control trial is performed on the issue.
As convictive evidence, Adam Smith proposed two distinct assumptions in two different disciplines, which are Moral Man in ethics and Economic Man in economics.
Godbeer fails to propose it, but his logic certainly suggests that the end of the trials--due to an inability to ferret out convictive testimony of witchcraft--saved the ministers from being forced to head a crusade against large numbers of practitioners of the black arts.
If a man could feel, Not one day, in the artist's ecstasy, But every day, feast, fast, or working-day, The spiritual significance burn through The hieroglyphic of material shows, Henceforward he would paint the globe with wings, And reverence fish and fowl, the bull, the tree, And even his very body as a man,-- Which now he counts so vile, that all the towns Make offal of their daughters for its use On summer-nights, when God is sad in heaven To think what goes on in his recreant world He made quite other; while that moon he made To she there, at the first love's covenant, Shines still, convictive as a marriage-ring Before adulterous eyes.