convincement


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con·vince

(kən-vĭns′)
tr.v. con·vinced, con·vinc·ing, con·vinc·es
1. To cause (someone) by the use of argument or evidence to believe something or to take a course of action. See Synonyms at persuade.
2. Obsolete
a. To prove to be wrong or guilty.
b. To conquer; overpower.

[Latin convincere, to prove wrong : com-, intensive pref.; see com- + vincere, to conquer; see weik-3 in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

con·vince′ment n.
con·vinc′er n.
con·vinc′i·ble adj.
Usage Note: According to a traditional rule, one persuades someone to act but convinces someone of the truth of a statement or proposition: By convincing me that no good could come of staying, he persuaded me to leave. If the distinction is accepted, then convince should not be used with an infinitive: He persuaded (not convinced) me to go. In our 1981 survey, 61 percent of the Usage Panel rejected the use of convince with an infinitive. But the tide of sentiment against the construction has turned. In our 2016 survey, 80 percent accepted it in the sentence I tried to convince him to chip in a few dollars, but he refused. Even in passive constructions, a majority of the Panel accepted convince with an infinitive; the sentence After listening to the teacher's report, the committee was convinced to go ahead with the new reading program was accepted by 59 percent of the Panel. Persuade, on the other hand, is fully standard when used with an infinitive or a that clause, in both active and passive constructions. An overwhelming majority of Panelists as far back as 1996 accepted the sentences After a long discussion with her lawyer, she was persuaded to drop the lawsuit and The President persuaded his advisers that military action was necessary. Some writers may wish to preserve the traditional distinction, but they should bear in mind that most readers are unlikely to notice.
Translations
References in classic literature ?
To be sure, he became a Friend by Convincement as the Quakers say, and so I cannot imagine that he was altogether worldly; but he had an eye to the main chance: he founded the industry of making flannels in the little Welsh town where he lived, and he seems to have grown richer, for his day and place, than any of us have since grown for ours.
Inspiration, convincement, and transformation-these are
Areopagitica, "the closest Milton ever came to systematic ecclesiology in his early prose," presents his vision of the nation inhabited by prophets "reading, trying all things, [and] assenting to the force of reason and convincement," and depicts "Christian liberty as a textual activity in which 'considerat builders' construct the 'spiritual architecture' of the church in 'free writing and free speaking'" (17-19).