convince

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con·vince

(kən-vĭns′)
tr.v. con·vinced, con·vinc·ing, con·vinc·es
1. To cause (someone) by the use of argument or evidence to believe something or to take a course of action. See Synonyms at persuade.
2. Obsolete
a. To prove to be wrong or guilty.
b. To conquer; overpower.

[Latin convincere, to prove wrong : com-, intensive pref.; see com- + vincere, to conquer; see weik-3 in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

con·vince′ment n.
con·vinc′er n.
con·vinc′i·ble adj.
Usage Note: According to a traditional rule, one persuades someone to act but convinces someone of the truth of a statement or proposition: By convincing me that no good could come of staying, he persuaded me to leave. If the distinction is accepted, then convince should not be used with an infinitive: He persuaded (not convinced) me to go. In our 1981 survey, 61 percent of the Usage Panel rejected the use of convince with an infinitive. But the tide of sentiment against the construction has turned. In our 2016 survey, 80 percent accepted it in the sentence I tried to convince him to chip in a few dollars, but he refused. Even in passive constructions, a majority of the Panel accepted convince with an infinitive; the sentence After listening to the teacher's report, the committee was convinced to go ahead with the new reading program was accepted by 59 percent of the Panel. Persuade, on the other hand, is fully standard when used with an infinitive or a that clause, in both active and passive constructions. An overwhelming majority of Panelists as far back as 1996 accepted the sentences After a long discussion with her lawyer, she was persuaded to drop the lawsuit and The President persuaded his advisers that military action was necessary. Some writers may wish to preserve the traditional distinction, but they should bear in mind that most readers are unlikely to notice.

convince

(kənˈvɪns)
vb (tr)
1. (may take a clause as object) to make (someone) agree, understand, or realize the truth or validity of something; persuade
2. chiefly US to persuade (someone) to do something
3. obsolete
a. to overcome
b. to prove guilty
[C16: from Latin convincere to demonstrate incontrovertibly, from com- (intensive) + vincere to overcome, conquer]
conˈvincement n
conˈvincer n
conˈvincible adj
Usage: The use of convince to talk about persuading someone to do something is considered by many British speakers to be wrong or unacceptable

con•vince

(kənˈvɪns)

v.t. -vinced, -vinc•ing.
1. to move by argument or evidence to belief, agreement, consent, or a course of action: to convince you of his guilt.
2. Obs. to prove or find guilty.
3. Obs. to overcome; vanquish.
[1520–30; < Latin convincere to prove (guilt), demonstrate =con- con- + vincere to overcome]
con•vinc′er, n.
usage: convince, an often stated rule says, may be followed only by that or of, never by to: We convinced him that he should enter (not convinced him to enter) the contest. He was convinced of the wisdom of entering. In support of the rule, convince is often contrasted with persuade, which may take to, of, or that:We persuaded him to seek counseling (or of his need for counseling or that he should seek counseling). The history of usage does not support the rule. convince (someone) to has been in use since the 16th century and, despite some objections, occurs today in all varieties of speech and writing and is fully standard.

convince

- Started out meaning "overcome, conquer."
See also related terms for overcome.

convince

persuade
1. 'convince'

If you convince someone of something, you make them believe it is true.

These experiences convinced me of the drug's harmful effects.
It took them a few days to convince me that it was possible.

Some speakers use convince with a to-infinitive to say that one person makes another person decide to do something, by giving them a good reason for doing it.

Lyon did his best to convince me to settle in Tennessee.
I hope you will help me convince my father to leave.
2. 'persuade'

Using 'convince' in this way is generally regarded as incorrect. Instead you should use persuade.

Marsha was trying to persuade Posy to change her mind.
They had no difficulty in persuading him to launch a new paper.

convince


Past participle: convinced
Gerund: convincing

Imperative
convince
convince
Present
I convince
you convince
he/she/it convinces
we convince
you convince
they convince
Preterite
I convinced
you convinced
he/she/it convinced
we convinced
you convinced
they convinced
Present Continuous
I am convincing
you are convincing
he/she/it is convincing
we are convincing
you are convincing
they are convincing
Present Perfect
I have convinced
you have convinced
he/she/it has convinced
we have convinced
you have convinced
they have convinced
Past Continuous
I was convincing
you were convincing
he/she/it was convincing
we were convincing
you were convincing
they were convincing
Past Perfect
I had convinced
you had convinced
he/she/it had convinced
we had convinced
you had convinced
they had convinced
Future
I will convince
you will convince
he/she/it will convince
we will convince
you will convince
they will convince
Future Perfect
I will have convinced
you will have convinced
he/she/it will have convinced
we will have convinced
you will have convinced
they will have convinced
Future Continuous
I will be convincing
you will be convincing
he/she/it will be convincing
we will be convincing
you will be convincing
they will be convincing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been convincing
you have been convincing
he/she/it has been convincing
we have been convincing
you have been convincing
they have been convincing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been convincing
you will have been convincing
he/she/it will have been convincing
we will have been convincing
you will have been convincing
they will have been convincing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been convincing
you had been convincing
he/she/it had been convincing
we had been convincing
you had been convincing
they had been convincing
Conditional
I would convince
you would convince
he/she/it would convince
we would convince
you would convince
they would convince
Past Conditional
I would have convinced
you would have convinced
he/she/it would have convinced
we would have convinced
you would have convinced
they would have convinced
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.convince - make (someone) agree, understand, or realize the truth or validity of something; "He had finally convinced several customers of the advantages of his product"
persuade - cause somebody to adopt a certain position, belief, or course of action; twist somebody's arm; "You can't persuade me to buy this ugly vase!"
disarm - make less hostile; win over; "Her charm disarmed the prosecution lawyer completely"

convince

verb
1. assure, persuade, satisfy, prove to, reassure I soon convinced him of my innocence.
2. persuade, induce, coax, talk into, prevail upon, inveigle, twist (someone's) arm, bring round to the idea of He convinced her to go ahead and marry Bud.
Usage: The use of convince to talk about persuading someone to do something is considered by many British speakers to be wrong or unacceptable. It would be preferable to use an alternative such as persuade or talk into.

convince

verb
1. To cause (another) to believe or feel sure about something:
2. To succeed in causing (a person) to act in a certain way:
Translations
يُقْـنِـعيُقْنِعُ
přesvědčit
overbevise
veenma
vakuuttaa
לשכנע
uvjeriti
sannfæra
確信させる納得させる自覚させる説得する
납득시키다
įtikinti
pārliecināt
prepričati
övertyga
โน้มน้าว
inandırmakikna etmek
thuyết phục

convince

[kənˈvɪns] VTconvencer
to convince sb (of sth/that)convencer a algn (de algo/de que)
I am not convincedno estoy convencido, no me convence

convince

[kənˈvɪns] vtconvaincre, persuader
to convince sb of sth → convaincre qn de qch
to convince sb (that) → persuader qn que
to convince sb to do sth → convaincre qn de faire qch

convince

vtüberzeugen; I’m trying to convince him that …ich versuche, ihn davon zu überzeugen, dass …

convince

[kənˈvɪns] vt to convince sb (of sth/that)convincere qn (di qc/che), persuadere qn (di qc/che)

convince

(kənˈvins) verb
to persuade (a person) that something is true. Her smile convinced me that she was happy; She is convinced of his innocence.
conˈvincing adjective
(negative unconvincing) having the power to convince. a convincing argument.

convince

يُقْنِعُ přesvědčit overbevise überzeugen πείθω convencer vakuuttaa convaincre uvjeriti convincere 確信させる 납득시키다 overtuigen overbevise przekonać convencer убеждать övertyga โน้มน้าว inandırmak thuyết phục 信服
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So, it's little wonder that he isn't keeping an eye on Sienna, who convincers herself that he's having an affair - with Nancy.
Because VH narratives, like other ULs, may sometimes be met with some audience scepticism, many contain elements that appear to function as authenticity convincers by providing ways of heading off disbelief.
At the company pavilion, the Mowasalat has displayed and demonstrated the advantages of having seatbelt convincers and roll-over simulators while adopting safe driving practices.