convulsion


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con·vul·sion

 (kən-vŭl′shən)
n.
1. An intense, paroxysmal, involuntary muscular contraction.
2. An uncontrolled fit, as of laughter; a paroxysm.
3. Violent turmoil: "The market convulsions of the last few weeks have shaken the world" (Felix Rohatyn).

convulsion

(kənˈvʌlʃən)
n
1. (Medicine) a violent involuntary contraction of a muscle or muscles
2. a violent upheaval, disturbance, or agitation, esp a social one
3. (usually plural) informal uncontrollable laughter: I was in convulsions.
conˈvulsionary adj

con•vul•sion

(kənˈvʌl ʃən)

n.
1. contortion of the body caused by violent, involuntary muscular contractions.
2. a violent disturbance.
3. an outburst of great, uncontrollable laughter.
[1575–85; < Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.convulsion - a sudden uncontrollable attack; "a paroxysm of giggling"; "a fit of coughing"; "convulsions of laughter"
attack - a sudden occurrence of an uncontrollable condition; "an attack of diarrhea"
2.convulsion - violent uncontrollable contractions of muscles
ictus, raptus, seizure - a sudden occurrence (or recurrence) of a disease; "he suffered an epileptic seizure"
clonus - convulsion characterized by alternating contractions and relaxations
epileptic seizure - convulsions accompanied by impaired consciousness
3.convulsion - a violent disturbanceconvulsion - a violent disturbance; "the convulsions of the stock market"
commotion, hoo-ha, hoo-hah, hurly burly, kerfuffle, to-do, disruption, disturbance, flutter - a disorderly outburst or tumult; "they were amazed by the furious disturbance they had caused"
4.convulsion - a physical disturbance such as an earthquake or upheaval
trouble - an event causing distress or pain; "what is the trouble?"; "heart trouble"

convulsion

noun
1. spasm, fit, shaking, seizure, contraction, tremor, cramp, contortion, paroxysm He fell to the floor in the grip of an epileptic convulsion.
2. upheaval, disturbance, furore, turbulence, agitation, commotion, tumult It was a decade that saw many great social, economic and political convulsions.

convulsion

noun
1. The condition of being physically agitated:
2. A momentous or sweeping change:
3. A condition of anguished struggle and disorder:
paroxysm, throe (used in plural).
Translations
křeč
krampekrampeanfaldkrampetrækning
kohtauskouristusmullistus
grč
háborgásrángató zásrángatózásrengés
rykkir, krampi
katılmasarsılma

convulsion

[kənˈvʌlʃən] N
1. (= fit, seizure) → convulsión f
to have convulsionstener convulsiones
2. (fig) → conmoción f
they were in convulsions [of laughter] → se desternillaban de risa

convulsion

[kənˈvʌlʃən] n (MEDICINE) (= fit) → convulsion f

convulsion

n
(Med) → Schüttelkrampf m no pl, → Konvulsion f (spec); (of crying) → Weinkrampf m no pl
(caused by social upheaval etc) → Erschütterung f
(inf, of laughter) to go into/be in convulsionssich biegen or schütteln vor Lachen; he had the audience in convulsionser rief beim Publikum wahre Lachstürme hervor

convulsion

[kənˈvʌlʃn] n (fit, seizure) → convulsione f
in convulsions (fam) (laughter) → piegato/a in due (dalle risate)

convulse

(kənˈvals) verb
to shake violently. convulsed with laughter.
conˈvulsive (-siv) adjective
conˈvulsively adverb
conˈvulsion (-ʃən) noun
(often in plural) a sudden stiffening or jerking of the muscles of the body.

con·vul·sion

n. convulsión, contracción involuntaria de un músculo;
febrile ______ febril;
Jacksonian ______ Jacksoniana;
tonic-clonic ______ tonicoclónica.

convulsion

n convulsión f, ataque m (fam)
References in classic literature ?
A final convulsion lifted her from the bed, until she appeared to rest upon her head and her heels, with her body arched in an extraordinary manner.
In the very heart of an extinct volcano, the interior of which has been invaded by the sea, after some great convulsion of the earth.
One arm was hanging out of the bed; from shoulder to elbow it was moulded after the arms of Germain Pillon's "Graces,"* but the fore-arm seemed to be slightly distorted by convulsion, and the hand, so delicately formed, was resting with stiff outstretched fingers on the framework of the bed.
I had a vague belief that he was suffering from a fit, or some form of convulsion.
But to what did they owe the convulsion and rapture of their transport?
We may imagine that stream of white lava had flowed from many parts of the mountain into the lower country, and that when solidified they had bee rent by some enormous convulsion into myriads of fragments.
There he hung, embracing the gutter, hardly breathing, no longer stirring, making no longer any other movements than that mechanical convulsion of the stomach, which one experiences in dreams when one fancies himself falling.
While this dumb convulsion lasted I could only watch it-- which I did the more intently when I saw Flora's face peep at me over our companion's shoulder.
Poverty ordinarily causes no such sensations to those who are conscious of possessing advantages of an order superior to wealth, and surely a well-educated, well-born, virtuous girl need not have blushed because estates were torn from her parents by a political convulsion that had overturned an ancient and powerful throne.
Groans, and convulsions, and a discolored face, and friends weeping, and blacks, and obsequies, and the like, show death terrible.
We need only confess that we do not know the purpose of the European convulsions and that we know only the facts- that is, the murders, first in France, then in Italy, in Africa, in Prussia, in Austria, in Spain, and in Russia- and that the movements from the west to the east and from the east to the west form the essence and purpose of these events, and not only shall we have no need to see exceptional ability and genius in Napoleon and Alexander, but we shall be unable to consider them to be anything but like other men, and we shall not be obliged to have recourse to chance for an explanation of those small events which made these people what they were, but it will be clear that all those small events were inevitable.
However, as the woman seemed likely to die with the convulsions that were tearing her, they concluded that the third could do no more than put her out of her misery with a happy dispatch.