cooling


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cool

 (ko͞ol)
adj. cool·er, cool·est
1. Neither warm nor very cold; moderately cold: fresh, cool water; a cool autumn evening.
2. Giving or suggesting relief from heat: a cool breeze; a cool blouse.
3. Marked by calm self-control: a cool negotiator.
4. Marked by indifference, disdain, or dislike; unfriendly or unresponsive: a cool greeting; was cool to the idea of higher taxes.
5. Of, relating to, or characteristic of colors, such as blue and green, that produce the impression of coolness.
6. Slang
a. Knowledgeable or aware of the latest trends or developments: spent all his time trying to be cool.
b. Excellent; first-rate: has a cool sports car; had a cool time at the party.
c. Acceptable; satisfactory: It's cool if you don't want to talk about it.
7. Slang Entire; full: worth a cool million.
adv.
Informal In a casual manner; nonchalantly: play it cool.
v. cooled, cool·ing, cools
v.tr.
1. To make less warm.
2. To make less ardent, intense, or zealous: problems that soon cooled my enthusiasm for the project.
3. Physics To reduce the molecular or kinetic energy of (an object).
v.intr.
1. To become less warm: took a dip to cool off.
2. To become calmer: needed time for tempers to cool.
n.
1. A cool place, part, or time: the cool of early morning.
2. The state or quality of being cool.
3. Composure; poise: "Our release marked a victory. The nation had kept its cool" (Moorhead Kennedy).
Idioms:
cool it Slang
1. To calm down; relax.
2. To stop doing something.
cool (one's) heels Informal
To wait or be kept waiting.

[Middle English cole, from Old English cōl; see gel- in Indo-European roots.]

cool′ish adj.
cool′ly adv.
cool′ness n.
Synonyms: cool, calm, composed, collected, imperturbable, nonchalant
These adjectives indicate absence of excitement or discomposure in a person, especially in times of stress. Cool usually implies an alert self-possession, but it may also indicate aloofness: "Keep strong, if possible. In any case, keep cool. Have unlimited patience" (B.H. Liddell Hart). "An honest hater is often a better fellow than a cool friend" (John Stuart Blackie).
Calm suggests a serenity achieved through mastery over agitation or inner turmoil: "It was like coming across a bear in the woods: you were supposed to stand still and remain calm, against every impulse" (Cheryl Strayed).
Composed and collected stress self-control brought about by mental concentration: The dancer was composed as she prepared for her recital. The witness remained collected throughout the questioning. Imperturbable and unruffled suggest equanimity in the face of potentially disturbing circumstances: The crises of 1837 shook his previously imperturbable composure (James A. Henretta).
Nonchalant describes a casual manner that may suggest either confidence or lack of concern: "the nonchalant way of loggers with regard to injuries" (Molly Gloss). See Also Synonyms at cold.
Our Living Language The usage of cool as a general positive epithet or interjection has been part and parcel of English slang since World War II, and has even been borrowed into other languages, such as French and German. Originally this sense is a development from its use in African American Vernacular English to mean "excellent, superlative," first recorded in written English in the early 1930s. Jazz musicians who used the term are responsible for its popularization during the 1940s. As a slang word expressing generally positive sentiment, it has stayed current (and cool) far longer than most such words. One of the main characteristics of slang is the continual renewal of its vocabulary and storehouse of expressions: in order for slang to stay slangy, it has to have a feeling of novelty. Slang expressions meaning the same thing as cool, like bully, capital, hot, groovy, hep, crazy, nervous, far-out, rad, tubular, def, and phat have for the most part not had the staying power or continued universal appeal of cool.

cooling

(ˈkuːlɪŋ)
adj
making one feel cool
ˈcoolingly adv
ˈcoolingness n
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cooling - the process of becoming coolercooling - the process of becoming cooler; a falling temperature
freeze, freezing - the withdrawal of heat to change something from a liquid to a solid
heat dissipation - dissipation of heat
infrigidation, refrigeration - the process of cooling or freezing (e.g., food) for preservative purposes
temperature change - a process whereby the degree of hotness of a body (or medium) changes
2.cooling - a mechanism for keeping something cool; "the cooling was overhead fans"
air conditioner, air conditioning - a system that keeps air cool and dry
coolant system - a cooling system that uses a fluid to transfer heat from one place to another
cooling tower - a cooling system used in industry to cool hot water (by partial evaporation) before reusing it as a coolant
evaporative cooler - a cooling system that cools by evaporation
mechanism - device consisting of a piece of machinery; has moving parts that perform some function
refrigeration system - a cooling system for chilling or freezing (usually for preservative purposes)
water pump - the pump in the cooling system of an automobile that cause the water to circulate
Translations
chlazení

cooling

[ˈkuːlɪŋ]
A. ADJrefrescante
B. CPD cooling tower N (at power station) → torre f de refrigeración
cooling fan Nventilador m

cooling

[ˈkuːlɪŋ] adj [breeze] → rafraîchissant(e)cooling-off period [ˌkuːlɪŋˈɒfpɪərɪəd] ndélai m de réflexioncooling system ncircuit m de refroidissementcooling tower ntour f de refroidissement

cooling

adj drink, showerkühlend; effect(ab)kühlend; affectionabnehmend; enthusiasm, interestnachlassend; cooling fanLüfter m

cooling

[ˈkuːlɪŋ] adjrinfrescante
cooling fan (Aut) → ventilatore m di raffreddamento
References in classic literature ?
It was a rather pretty little picture, for the sisters sat together in the shady nook, with sun and shadow flickering over them, the aromatic wind lifting their hair and cooling their hot cheeks, and all the little wood people going on with their affairs as if these were no strangers but old friends.
cried a second to another, which, close to our gunwale, seemed calmly cooling himself with his own fan-like extremity.
Stiff with wounds and bruises, Tom was a long time in accomplishing this movement; but, when done, he felt a sensible relief from the cooling application to his wounds.
Close at hand was the snowy mass of the Great Altels cooling its topknot in the sky and daring us to an ascent.
Elton being the adoration of all the teachers and great girls in the school; and it must be at Hartfield only that she could have any chance of hearing him spoken of with cooling moderation or repellent truth.
After half an hour's cooling in the churchyard, I saw the chariot coming back.
Our punch was cooling in an ornamental lake, on whose margin the bower was raised.
ABOUT noon I stopped at the captain's door with some cooling drinks and medicines.
All these different products are afforded before the nut is formed, and while it is green it contains a delicious cooling water; with these nuts they store their gelves, and it is the only provision of water which is made in this country.
Cool a spoonful of hot water just one degree, and the energy set free by the cooling will operate a telephone for ten thousand years.
Sancho had recourse to the larder of his alforjas and took out of them what he called the prog; Don Quixote rinsed his mouth and bathed his face, by which cooling process his flagging energies were revived.
So the cooling stream was very pleasing and grateful to their senses.