coolness


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cool

 (ko͞ol)
adj. cool·er, cool·est
1. Neither warm nor very cold; moderately cold: fresh, cool water; a cool autumn evening.
2. Giving or suggesting relief from heat: a cool breeze; a cool blouse.
3. Marked by calm self-control: a cool negotiator.
4. Marked by indifference, disdain, or dislike; unfriendly or unresponsive: a cool greeting; was cool to the idea of higher taxes.
5. Of, relating to, or characteristic of colors, such as blue and green, that produce the impression of coolness.
6. Slang
a. Knowledgeable or aware of the latest trends or developments: spent all his time trying to be cool.
b. Excellent; first-rate: has a cool sports car; had a cool time at the party.
c. Acceptable; satisfactory: It's cool if you don't want to talk about it.
7. Slang Entire; full: worth a cool million.
adv.
Informal In a casual manner; nonchalantly: play it cool.
v. cooled, cool·ing, cools
v.tr.
1. To make less warm.
2. To make less ardent, intense, or zealous: problems that soon cooled my enthusiasm for the project.
3. Physics To reduce the molecular or kinetic energy of (an object).
v.intr.
1. To become less warm: took a dip to cool off.
2. To become calmer: needed time for tempers to cool.
n.
1. A cool place, part, or time: the cool of early morning.
2. The state or quality of being cool.
3. Composure; poise: "Our release marked a victory. The nation had kept its cool" (Moorhead Kennedy).
Idioms:
cool it Slang
1. To calm down; relax.
2. To stop doing something.
cool (one's) heels Informal
To wait or be kept waiting.

[Middle English cole, from Old English cōl; see gel- in Indo-European roots.]

cool′ish adj.
cool′ly adv.
cool′ness n.
Synonyms: cool, calm, composed, collected, imperturbable, nonchalant
These adjectives indicate absence of excitement or discomposure in a person, especially in times of stress. Cool usually implies an alert self-possession, but it may also indicate aloofness: "Keep strong, if possible. In any case, keep cool. Have unlimited patience" (B.H. Liddell Hart)."An honest hater is often a better fellow than a cool friend" (John Stuart Blackie).
Calm suggests a serenity achieved through mastery over agitation or inner turmoil: "It was like coming across a bear in the woods: you were supposed to stand still and remain calm, against every impulse" (Cheryl Strayed).
Composed and collected stress self-control brought about by mental concentration: The dancer was composed as she prepared for her recital. The witness remained collected throughout the questioning. Imperturbable and unruffled suggest equanimity in the face of potentially disturbing circumstances: The crises of 1837 shook his previously imperturbable composure (James A. Henretta).
Nonchalant describes a casual manner that may suggest either confidence or lack of concern: "the nonchalant way of loggers with regard to injuries" (Molly Gloss). See Also Synonyms at cold.
Our Living Language The usage of cool as a general positive epithet or interjection has been part and parcel of English slang since World War II, and has even been borrowed into other languages, such as French and German. Originally this sense is a development from its use in African American Vernacular English to mean "excellent, superlative," first recorded in written English in the early 1930s. Jazz musicians who used the term are responsible for its popularization during the 1940s. As a slang word expressing generally positive sentiment, it has stayed current (and cool) far longer than most such words. One of the main characteristics of slang is the continual renewal of its vocabulary and storehouse of expressions: in order for slang to stay slangy, it has to have a feeling of novelty. Slang expressions meaning the same thing as cool, like bully, capital, hot, groovy, hep, crazy, nervous, far-out, rad, tubular, def, and phat have for the most part not had the staying power or continued universal appeal of cool.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.coolness - calm and unruffled self-assurance; "he performed with all the coolness of a veteran"
calmness - a feeling of calm; an absence of agitation or excitement
2.coolness - the property of being moderately cold; "the chilliness of early morning"
low temperature, cold, frigidity, frigidness, coldness - the absence of heat; "the coldness made our breath visible"; "come in out of the cold"; "cold is a vasoconstrictor"
3.coolness - fearless self-possession in the face of danger
fearlessness - the trait of feeling no fear
4.coolness - a lack of affection or enthusiasm; "a distressing coldness of tone and manner"
emotionlessness, unemotionality - absence of emotion
stone - a lack of feeling or expression or movement; "he must have a heart of stone"; "her face was as hard as stone"
lukewarmness, tepidness - lack of passion, force or animation

coolness

noun
1. coldness, freshness, chilliness, nippiness He felt the coolness of the tiled floor.
coldness sunniness, tepidity, warmness
4. impudence, audacity, boldness, insolence, impertinence, shamelessness, cheekiness, brazenness, presumptuousness, audaciousness The coolness of his suggestion took her breath away.

coolness

noun
1. Relative lack of physical warmth:
Translations
بُـرودَه
chladklid
fattethedsindsro
svali; fáleiki; stilling
coolitate
serinkanlılıkserinlik

coolness

[ˈkuːlnɪs] N
1. (= coldness) [of water, air, weather] → frescor m
2. (= calmness) → tranquilidad f, serenidad f; (in battle, crisis) → sangre f fría
3. (pej) (= audacity) → frescura f, descaro m
4. (= lack of enthusiasm) [of welcome, person] → frialdad f
her coolness towards himsu frialdad con él

coolness

[ˈkuːlnɪs] n
[air, water, skin] → fraîcheur f
(= calmness) [person] → sang-froid m, calme m
(= coldness) [person] → froideur f

coolness

n
(of water, weather, drink)Kühle f; (of clothes)Luftigkeit f, → Leichtigkeit f
(= calmness, of person, manner) → Besonnenheit f; (of voice)Kühle f
(= audacity, impudence)Kaltblütigkeit f, → Unverfrorenheit f (pej), → Kaltschnäuzigkeit f (inf)
(= unfriendliness: of greeting, reception, look) → Kühle f

coolness

[ˈkuːlnɪs] n (of air, weather) → frescura, fresco; (of drink) → freschezza; (calmness) → calma, controllo, sangue m freddo; (of welcome) → freddezza; (impudence) → sfacciataggine

cool

(kuːl) adjective
1. slightly cold. cool weather.
2. calm or not excitable. He's very cool in a crisis.
3. not very friendly. He was very cool towards me.
4. (slang) great; terrific; fantastic. Wow, that's really cool!; You look cool in those jeans!
verb
1. to make or become less warm. The jelly will cool better in the refrigerator; She cooled her hands in the stream.
2. to become less strong. His affection for her has cooled; Her anger cooled.
noun
cool air or atmosphere. the cool of the evening.
ˈcoolly adverb
ˈcoolness noun
cool-ˈheaded adjective
able to act calmly.
cool down
1. to make or become less warm. Let your food cool down a bit!
2. to make or become less excited or less emotional. He was very angry but he's cooled down now.
keep one's cool
not to become over-excited or confused. If you keep your cool you won't fail.
lose one's cool
not to keep one's cool.

coolness

n. frialdad; serenidad.
References in classic literature ?
The coolness of you two rascals is amazing," began Mr.
As the sun sank there came a sudden coolness and the strong smell of earth and drying grass.
They had recently seen a chosen army from that country, which, reverencing as a mother, they had blindly believed invincible--an army led by a chief who had been selected from a crowd of trained warriors, for his rare military endowments, disgracefully routed by a handful of French and Indians, and only saved from annihilation by the coolness and spirit of a Virginian boy, whose riper fame has since diffused itself, with the steady influence of moral truth, to the uttermost confines of Christendom.
Six hours later, when the shadow of Devil's Spur had crossed the river, and spread a slight coolness over the flat beyond, the Pioneer coach, leaving the summit, began also to bathe its heated bulk in the long shadows of the descent.
Look now at Stubb; a man who from his humorous, deliberate coolness and equanimity in the direst emergencies, was specially qualified to excel in pitchpoling.
So, in short, Haley," said he, suddenly dropping from the tone of dignified coolness to his ordinary one of easy frankness, "the best way for you is to keep good-natured and eat some breakfast, and we will then see what is to be done.
Even the fearful shock which their nerves had sustained was not sufficient to overcome their coolness and courage.
Think of the smartness and coolness of that blatherskite
He was, in a word, a man of the most in- flexible firmness and stone-like coolness.
Woodhouse's tender habits required almost every evening throughout the year, he soon afterwards took a hasty leave, and walked home to the coolness and solitude of Donwell Abbey.
Elinor, this eldest daughter, whose advice was so effectual, possessed a strength of understanding, and coolness of judgment, which qualified her, though only nineteen, to be the counsellor of her mother, and enabled her frequently to counteract, to the advantage of them all, that eagerness of mind in Mrs.
I was not dreaming," I said, with some warmth, for her brazen coolness provoked me.