coon


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

coon

 (ko͞on)
n.
1. Informal A raccoon.
2. Offensive Slang Used as a disparaging term for a black person.

[Short for raccoon. Sense 2, perhaps after Zip Coon, an African-American character (depicted as an upstart freeman) in the song "Zip Coon" frequently sung in 19th-century blackface minstrel shows (the character perhaps being so named in reference to the black facial mask of the raccoon and to the practice of hunting and eating raccoons frequently mentioned in minstrel show songs), possibly influenced by 19th-century slang coon, rural white American (often one of modest means and opposed to the slave-owning Southern establishment), fellow, so called in reference to the association of coonskin with American frontiersmen.]

coon

(kuːn)
n
1. (Animals) informal short for raccoon
2. (Peoples) offensive slang a Black person or a native Australian
3. (Peoples) offensive South African a person of mixed race

coon

(kun)

n.
usage: Definition 2 is a slur and should be avoided. It is used with disparaging intent and is perceived as highly insulting.
n.
1. raccoon.
2. Slang: Extremely Disparaging and Offensive. (a contemptuous term used to refer to a black person.)
[1735–45, Amer.; short for raccoon]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.coon - an eccentric or undignified rustic; "I'll be a gone coon when the battle starts"
rustic - an unsophisticated country person
2.coon - (ethnic slur) extremely offensive name for a Black person; "only a Black can call another Black a nigga"
derogation, disparagement, depreciation - a communication that belittles somebody or something
ethnic slur - a slur on someone's race or language
Black person, blackamoor, Negro, Negroid, Black - a person with dark skin who comes from Africa (or whose ancestors came from Africa)
3.coon - North American raccooncoon - North American raccoon    
racoon, raccoon - an omnivorous nocturnal mammal native to North America and Central America
Translations

coon

[kuːn] N
1. (Zool) = raccoon
2. (= Negro) → negro/a m/f (pej)

coon

n
(Zool) → Waschbär m
(very offensive sl)Nigger m (very offensive)
References in classic literature ?
Better tell that coon to stick right alongside you.
What did I want with the little cuss, now," he said to himself, "that I should have got myself treed like a coon, as I am, this yer way?
So, now, old coon," said he to the man at the bar, "get us hot water, and sugar, and cigars, and plenty of the real stuff and we'll have a blow-out.
And didn't I car Mas'r Haley night five miles out of de road, dis evening, or else he'd a come up with Lizy as easy as a dog arter a coon.
Agamemnon was convulsed with pain, but still not even for this did he leave off struggling and fighting, but grasped his spear that flew as fleet as the wind, and sprang upon Coon who was trying to drag off the body of his brother--his father's son--by the foot, and was crying for help to all the bravest of his comrades; but Agamemnon struck him with a bronze-shod spear and killed him as he was dragging the dead body through the press of men under cover of his shield: he then cut off his head, standing over the body of Iphidamas.
I'm a gone coon this first time and--and I w-want you to take these here things--to--my-- folks.
I can't speak to him for a minute on the poop without that thimble-rigging coon coming gliding up.
The staid, sober, thinking and industrious ones of our number would employ themselves in making corn-brooms, mats, horse-collars, and baskets; and another class of us would spend the time in hunting opossums, hares, and coons.
As you could have predicted, Assembly of First Nations National Chief Matthew Coon Come and Indian and Northern Affairs Minister Robert Nault had widely varying views on the importance of the speech from the throne delivered by Governor General Adrienne Clarkson on Sept.
In one memorable passage he unearths the origins of black blues shouter BigJoe Turner's "I Got a Gal for Every Day in the Week" in "a ragtime coon song composed in 1900.
7) In short, Coon argues that the Perth Group set up artificial, phony criteria for "proof' of HIV's isolation that bear no relation to how virology works in the real world.