cooper


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coop·er

 (ko͞o′pər)
n.
A person who makes or repairs wooden barrels and tubs.

[Middle English couper, from Middle Dutch kūper, from kūpe, basket, tub; see coop.]

coop′er v.
coop′er·age n.

cooper

(ˈkuːpə)
n
(Crafts) Also called: hooper a person skilled in making and repairing barrels, casks, etc
vb
1. (Crafts) (tr) to make or mend (barrels, casks, etc)
2. (Crafts) (intr) to work as a cooper
[C13: from Middle Dutch cūper or Middle Low German kūper; see coop1]

Cooper

(ˈkuːpə)
n
1. (Biography) Anthony Ashley. See (Earl of) Shaftesbury
2. (Biography) Cary (Lynn). born 1940, British psychologist, noted for his studies of behaviour at work and the causes and treatment of stress
3. (Biography) Gary, real name Frank James Cooper. 1901–61, US film actor; his many films include Sergeant York (1941) and High Noon (1952), for both of which he won Oscars
4. (Biography) Sir Henry. 1934–2011, British boxer; European heavyweight champion (1964; 1968–71)
5. (Biography) James Fenimore 1789–1851, US novelist, noted for his stories of Native Americans, esp The Last of the Mohicans (1826)
6. (Biography) Leon Neil. born 1930, US physicist, noted for his work on the theory of superconductivity. He shared the Nobel prize for physics 1972
7. (Biography) Samuel 1609–72, English miniaturist

coop•er

(ˈku pər, ˈkʊp ər)

n.
1. a person who makes or repairs casks, barrels, or tubs.
v.t.
2. to work as a cooper on.
v.i.
3. to work as a cooper.
[1350–1400; Middle English couper < Middle Low German kūper or Middle Dutch cūper < Medieval Latin cūpārius (Latin cūp(a) cask, vat + -ārius -ary)]

Coo•per

(ˈku pər, ˈkʊp ər)

n.
1. Anthony Ashley, Shaftesbury, Anthony Ashley Cooper.
2. James Fenimore, 1789–1851, U.S. novelist.
3. Peter, 1791–1883, U.S. inventor and philanthropist.

cooper


Past participle: coopered
Gerund: coopering

Imperative
cooper
cooper
Present
I cooper
you cooper
he/she/it coopers
we cooper
you cooper
they cooper
Preterite
I coopered
you coopered
he/she/it coopered
we coopered
you coopered
they coopered
Present Continuous
I am coopering
you are coopering
he/she/it is coopering
we are coopering
you are coopering
they are coopering
Present Perfect
I have coopered
you have coopered
he/she/it has coopered
we have coopered
you have coopered
they have coopered
Past Continuous
I was coopering
you were coopering
he/she/it was coopering
we were coopering
you were coopering
they were coopering
Past Perfect
I had coopered
you had coopered
he/she/it had coopered
we had coopered
you had coopered
they had coopered
Future
I will cooper
you will cooper
he/she/it will cooper
we will cooper
you will cooper
they will cooper
Future Perfect
I will have coopered
you will have coopered
he/she/it will have coopered
we will have coopered
you will have coopered
they will have coopered
Future Continuous
I will be coopering
you will be coopering
he/she/it will be coopering
we will be coopering
you will be coopering
they will be coopering
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been coopering
you have been coopering
he/she/it has been coopering
we have been coopering
you have been coopering
they have been coopering
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been coopering
you will have been coopering
he/she/it will have been coopering
we will have been coopering
you will have been coopering
they will have been coopering
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been coopering
you had been coopering
he/she/it had been coopering
we had been coopering
you had been coopering
they had been coopering
Conditional
I would cooper
you would cooper
he/she/it would cooper
we would cooper
you would cooper
they would cooper
Past Conditional
I would have coopered
you would have coopered
he/she/it would have coopered
we would have coopered
you would have coopered
they would have coopered

Cooper

One who makes or repairs wooden barrels.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Cooper - United States industrialist who built the first American locomotiveCooper - United States industrialist who built the first American locomotive; founded Cooper Union in New York City to offer free courses in the arts and sciences (1791-1883)
2.Cooper - United States film actor noted for his portrayals of strong silent heroes (1901-1961)Cooper - United States film actor noted for his portrayals of strong silent heroes (1901-1961)
3.Cooper - United States novelist noted for his stories of American Indians and the frontier life (1789-1851)Cooper - United States novelist noted for his stories of American Indians and the frontier life (1789-1851)
4.Cooper - a craftsman who makes or repairs wooden barrels or tubscooper - a craftsman who makes or repairs wooden barrels or tubs
artisan, journeyman, artificer, craftsman - a skilled worker who practices some trade or handicraft
Verb1.cooper - make barrels and casks
make - make by shaping or bringing together constituents; "make a dress"; "make a cake"; "make a wall of stones"
Translations
aamissepppüttsepp
bednarz

cooper

[ˈkuːpəʳ] Ntonelero/a m/f

cooper

[ˈkuːpər] (old-fashioned) n (= barrel-maker) → tonnelier m

cooper

nBöttcher m, → Küfer m (dial)
References in classic literature ?
When in July, 1826, Cooper landed in England with his wife and family, he carried his Indian memories and associations with him.
It is worth note that during his French visit Cooper met Sir Walter Scott.
It was with greater satisfaction that they welcomed his success, since Perkins and Cooper had fallen upon evil days: Cooper drank like a fish, and just before Tom Perkins took his degree the linendrapers filed their petition in bankruptcy.
No one could be expected to forget that he was the son of a bankrupt linendraper, and the alcoholism of Cooper seemed to increase the disgrace.
Strictly speaking, Daniel Cooper was one figure of the anglaise.
As soon as the provocatively gay strains of Daniel Cooper (somewhat resembling those of a merry peasant dance) began to sound, all the doorways of the ballroom were suddenly filled by the domestic serfs- the men on one side and the women on the other- who with beaming faces had come to see their master making merry.
Well, did you tell your wife not to give the cooper any vodka?
Vasili Andreevich repeated the jest about the cooper in his loud, clear voice.
It went crashing down the hillside, tearing up saplings, mowing bushes down like grass, ripping and crushing and smashing every thing in its path--eternally splintered and scattered a wood pile at the foot of the hill, and then sprang from the high bank clear over a dray in the road--the negro glanced up once and dodged--and the next second it made infinitesimal mince-meat of a frame cooper-shop, and the coopers swarmed out like bees.
He tingled with the excitement of the chase, and endeavoured to creep through the undergrowth like one of those intelligent Indians of whom he had read so many years before in the pages of Mr Fenimore Cooper.
While still warm, the oil, like hot punch, is received into the six-barrel casks; and while, perhaps, the ship is pitching and rolling this way and that in the midnight sea, the enormous casks are slewed round and headed over, end for end, and sometimes perilously scoot across the slippery deck, like so many land slides, till at last man-handled and stayed in their course; and all round the hoops, rap, rap, go as many hammers as can play upon them, for now, ex officio, every sailor is a cooper.
They were nearly all whalemen; chief mates, and second mates, and third mates, and sea carpenters, and sea coopers, and sea blacksmiths, and harpooneers, and ship keepers; a brown and brawny company, with bosky beards; an unshorn, shaggy set, all wearing monkey jackets for morning gowns.