coordinate clause


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coordinate clause

n
(Grammar) one of two or more clauses in a sentence having the same status and introduced by coordinating conjunctions. Compare subordinate clause

coor′dinate clause′


n.
one of two or more clauses of equal status in a sentence, esp. when joined by a coordinating conjunction, as either The sun came out or the ice started to melt in The sun came out and the ice started to melt. Compare subordinate clause.
[1870–75]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.coordinate clause - a clause in a complex sentence that is grammatically equivalent to the main clause and that performs the same grammatical function
complex sentence - a sentence composed of at least one main clause and one subordinate clause
clause - (grammar) an expression including a subject and predicate but not constituting a complete sentence
References in periodicals archive ?
In Old English split coordination, however, the presence of additive adjuncts like eac (swa), (eac) swilce, samod, or mid him is not obligatory, and quite often the split element appears in isolation in the second, coordinate clause.
In spoken language, clauses are structured so that they are chained together in succession, in the form of coordinate clauses, frequently leading to very long utterances.