copartnery

copartnery

(kəʊˈpɑːtnərɪ)
n
copartnership
References in periodicals archive ?
at 264-65 ("[Directors of [joint stock companies], being the managers rather of other people's money than of their own, it cannot well be expected that they should watch over it with the same anxious vigilance with which the partners in a private copartnery frequently watch over their own").
In the Wealth of Nations, first published in 1776, Adam Smith credited the HBC with carrying on the trade with a considerable degree of success on account of its small size, which enabled it to have nearly the same degree of vigilance and attention as a copartnery.
The directors of such companies, however, being the managers rather of other peoples' money than of their own, it cannot well be expected, that they should watch over it with the same anxious vigilance with which the partners in a private copartnery frequently watch over their own .
Over two centuries ago Adam Smith in The Wealth of Nations made the following observation regarding agents of companies: "The directors of such companies, however, being the managers rather of other people's money than of their own, it cannot well be expected that they should watch over it with the same anxious vigilance with which the partners in a private copartnery frequently watch over their own.
being the managers rather of other people's money than of their own, it cannot well be expected, that they should watch over it with the same anxious vigilance with which the partners in the private copartnery frequently watch over their own.
He had this to say about the directors of such a business: "Being the managers rather of other people's money than of their own, it cannot be well expected that they should watch over it with the same anxious vigilance with which partners in a private copartnery frequently watch over their own.
McLennan noted, 'Savages are unrestrained by any sense of delicacy from a copartnery in sexual enjoyments; and, indeed, in the civilised state, the sin of great cities shows that there are no natural restraints sufficient to hold men back from grosser copartneries'.
The directors of such [joint-stock] companies, however, being the managers rather of other people's money than their own, it cannot well be expected, that they should watch over it with the same anxious vigilance with which partners in a private copartnery frequently watch over their own.