copepod


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co·pe·pod

 (kō′pə-pŏd′)
n.
Any of numerous small marine or freshwater crustaceans of the subclass Copepoda, including parasitic and free-living forms.

[From New Latin Cōpēpoda, order name : Greek kōpē, oar; see kap- in Indo-European roots + New Latin -poda, -pod.]

copepod

(ˈkəʊpɪˌpɒd)
n
(Animals) any minute free-living or parasitic crustacean of the subclass Copepoda of marine and fresh waters: an important constituent of plankton
adj
(Animals) of, relating to, or belonging to the Copepoda
[C19: from New Latin Copepoda, from Greek kōpē oar + pous foot]

co•pe•pod

(ˈkoʊ pəˌpɒd)

n.
any tiny marine or freshwater crustacean of the class Copepoda: some are abundant in plankton and others are parasitic.
[1830–40; < New Latin Copepoda= cope-, appar. for copo-, combining form of Greek kṓpē handle, oar + -poda -poda]

co·pe·pod

(kō′pə-pŏd′)
Any of various very small crustaceans having an elongated body and a forked tail. Copepods are abundant in both salt and fresh water. They are an important food source for many water animals.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.copepod - minute marine or freshwater crustaceans usually having six pairs of limbs on the thoraxcopepod - minute marine or freshwater crustaceans usually having six pairs of limbs on the thorax; some abundant in plankton and others parasitic on fish
plankton - the aggregate of small plant and animal organisms that float or drift in great numbers in fresh or salt water
crustacean - any mainly aquatic arthropod usually having a segmented body and chitinous exoskeleton
Copepoda, subclass Copepoda - minute planktonic or parasitic crustaceans
britt, brit - minute crustaceans forming food for right whales
water flea, cyclops - minute free-swimming freshwater copepod having a large median eye and pear-shaped body and long antennae used in swimming; important in some food chains and as intermediate hosts of parasitic worms that affect man e.g. Guinea worms
fish louse - a kind of copepod
References in periodicals archive ?
Our team from the Autonomous Systems Laboratory at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) is helping to untangle the combination of physical and biological processes that form these dense copepod patches.
The study by the University of California - Davis looked at the tiny copepod Tigriopus californicus, found from Alaska to Baja, California and live in tide pools, and found that the animals showed little ability to evolve heat tolerance.
Herein, we present a complete inventory and perform a general analysis of taxonomic composition and biogeographic affinities of the copepod fauna in the Chihuahuan Desert and compare it with adjacent areas of North America.
nihonkaiense is the freshwater zooplanktonic copepod Cyclops strenuus (15), whether freshwater is the place of transmission of the parasite from the copepod to salmon remains controversial.
By carefully considering both nauplius and copepod development, they can compare across species as they describe variation in the number of stages of development, limbs and appendages, internal anatomy, behaviors, seasonal cycles and migration, ecology and mortality, and the patterning of the appendages of the copepods.
Knowing the impact of formalin on copepod size helps us to obtain reliable estimates of copepod biomass and thus to better assess the energy flow to higher trophic levels.
Meagan Williams, who presented the paper, "Biochemical analysis of developing eggs of the American Horeshoe crab Limulus polyphemus from Delaware Bay and the Gulf of Mexico"; and Angelos Apeitos, who presented the paper, "The effect of diet on fecundity of Acartia tonsa, a calanoid copepod.
rams, procercoids inhabit the hemocoel of a cyclopoid copepod and the definitive host can be infected during its larval stage either by swallowing an infected copepod or as an adult by accidentally swallowing an infected intermediate host (Thomas 1937b; Jarroll 1979; 1980).
Halse has recently identified a new species of calanoid copepod (Calamoecia trilobata) from saline lakes in the central and southern wheatbelt.
Graphs and equations Ludwig developed show the pivotal window of opportunity when two other essential food sources, rotifers and minute crustaceans called copepod nauplii, become abundant and zooplankton are still too small to be a threat.
The bacterium that causes cholera, Vibrio cholerae, has a known association with the crustacean copepod which lives on zooplankton, a type of plankton.