copulative


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cop·u·la·tive

 (kŏp′yə-lā′tĭv, -lə-tĭv)
adj.
1. Grammar
a. Serving to connect coordinate words or clauses: a copulative conjunction.
b. Serving as a copula: a copulative verb.
2. Of or relating to copulation.
n. Grammar
A copulative word or group of words.

cop′u·la′tive·ly adv.

copulative

(ˈkɒpjʊlətɪv)
adj
1. serving to join or unite
2. of or characteristic of copulation
3. (Grammar) grammar (of a verb) having the nature of a copula
ˈcopulatively adv

cop•u•la•tive

(ˈkɒp yəˌleɪ tɪv, -lə tɪv)

adj.
1. serving to unite or couple.
2.
a. (of a verb) pertaining to or serving as a copula.
b. (of a conjunction) serving to connect words, phrases, or clauses of equal rank with a cumulative effect, as and.
3. pertaining to sexual intercourse.
n.
4. a copulative word.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin]
cop′u•la`tive•ly, adv.

copulative

Used to describe a verb that acts as a copula.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.copulative - an equating verb (such as `be' or `become') that links the subject with the complement of a sentence
verb - a content word that denotes an action, occurrence, or state of existence
Adj.1.copulative - syntactically connecting sentences or elements of a sentence; "`and' is a copulative conjunction"
grammar - the branch of linguistics that deals with syntax and morphology (and sometimes also deals with semantics)
conjunctive - serving or tending to connect
Translations

copulative

[ˈkɒpjʊlətɪv] ADJcopulativo

copulative

(Gram)
nKopula f
adjkopulativ

copulative

[ˈkɒpjʊlətɪv] adjcopulativo/a
References in periodicals archive ?
In other words, the predication of a subject adjunct is at the same level as the predication of a subject complement, except that the copulative verb is not explicit (even if it is recoverable and the result is not unacceptable).
And that is why for my generation, love was not just copulative acts but a whole big procedure, strife, the magic of winning this loveliness, this drop of beauty in our world, to use great words.
As I read his statement in Science and Sanity, he means by "is of identity" only the copulative use of forms of be followed by a noun or noun construction.
Bloomfield expressed his frustration: "Accordingly, Katyayana's 'avara etc' remains unintelligible except as a laconic indication of a flaw, namely that Panini's wording disagrees with the rules of order in copulative compounds.
Olsen's (2001) generalization that copulative compounds cannot refer to disjoint entities [owner-builder must express a single person who owns and builds, unlike the syntactic coordination in the owner and builder were here]).
6) This rule, as you undoubtedly know, is supposed to distinguish the copulative (predicative) estin from its other Frege-Russell senses.
The copulative compound (smrtisile) occurs here in the form of "mutual-relation.
Copulative verbs do not presuppose referentially distinct participants, but they do involve distinct views of the same entity: this explains why the accusative lo is resorted to in order to pronominalize predicates (Garcia 1975: 377-383).
73) This is similar to the manner in which a copulative proposition and a disjunctive proposition - "Peter and Paul run," and "Peter or Paul runs," for instance - do not differ with respect to their object, but by their ways of intending that object, ways signified respectively by "and" and "or.
Whitney 1889: 488 (last section but one under copulative compounds, headed "Repeated Words"), Macdonell 1916: 281-82 (last compound type discussed), Renou 1952: 123-24 (small print under heading "classement des composes").
For instance, copulative compounds such as man + wijf, `man + bitch', 'mannish woman' never take a linking morpheme.