coquina

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co·qui·na

 (kō-kē′nə)
n.
1. Any of various small marine clams of the genus Donax having variously colored, often striped or banded wedge-shaped shells, and found especially on sandy beaches along the Atlantic coast of the United States.
2. A soft porous limestone, composed essentially of fragments of shells and coral, used as a building material.

[Spanish, cockle, probably diminutive of concha, shell, from Latin, mussel; see conch.]

coquina

(kɒˈkiːnə)
n
(Geological Science) a soft limestone consisting of shells, corals, etc, that occurs in parts of the US
[C19: from Spanish: shellfish, probably from concha shell, conch]

co•qui•na

(koʊˈki nə)

n., pl. -nas.
1. Also called butterfly shell. a small clam, Donax variabilis, having fanlike bands of various hues and common in intertidal zones of the E and S U.S. coasts: the paired empty shells often spread in a butterfly shape.
2. any similar clam.
3. a soft whitish rock made up of fragments of marine shells and coral, used as a building material.
[1830–40, Amer.; < Sp: literally, shellfish = Old Spanish coc(a) shellfish (< Latin concha; see conch) + -ina -ine3]

co·qui·na

(kō-kē′nə)
A brittle limestone made of shells and shell fragments.
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References in periodicals archive ?
ABSTRACT Coquina clams (Donax variabilis) were sampled monthly at 2 sites in Pinellas County, Florida, to document recruitment and growth.
1992, The ecology of coquina clams Donax variabilis Say, 1822, and Donax parvula Philippi, 1849, on the east coast of Florida.
For HAV, these values are in the same range or even higher than in the coquina clams from Peru implicated in the outbreak in Spain in 2008, which is noteworthy because the attack rate for different batches of shellfish is dose dependent (6).
Along ocean beaches, they scour the wash for sandfleas and coquina clams.
Some specific topics examined include seasonal collections of coquina clams during the Archaic and St.
queen conchs, Strombus gigas; coquina clams, Donax denticulata; and marshclams, Polymesoda placans, while industrial-scale fishermen land pink shrimp, P.
Wave sounds recorded in the beach amidst coquina clams show distinct patterns of sound that allow the clams to predict the size and timing of incoming swash.
Finch has plenty of rigs pre-made, but he also brings his beads with him, to rig with the exact bead color to match the color of the coquina clams on the beach that day.
Florida coquina clams normally are not exploited as a food resource by humans today; however, archaeological sites in northeastern Florida attest to the fact that preColumbian people consumed vast quantities of coquina clams between the middle Archaic (ca.