coracoid


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cor·a·coid

 (kôr′ə-koid′, kŏr′-)
n.
1. A bony process projecting from the scapula toward the sternum in mammals.
2. A beak-shaped bone articulating with the scapula and sternum in many other vertebrates, such as birds and reptiles.
adj.
Of, relating to, or resembling a coracoid.

[New Latin coracoīdēs, from Greek korakoeidēs, ravenlike : korax, korak-, raven + -oeidēs, -oid.]

coracoid

(ˈkɒrəˌkɔɪd)
n
(Zoology) a paired ventral bone of the pectoral girdle in vertebrates. In mammals it is reduced to a peg (the coracoid process) on the scapula
[C18: from New Latin coracoīdēs, from Greek korakoeidēs like a raven, curved like a raven's beak, from korax raven]

cor•a•coid

(ˈkɔr əˌkɔɪd, ˈkɒr-)

n.
a bony process on the scapula of mammals that extends to the sternum in birds, reptiles, and monotremes.
[1700–10; < New Latin coracoīdēs < Greek korakoeidḗs ravenlike =korak-, s. of kórax raven + -oeidēs -oid]
Translations

cor·a·coid

n. coracoides, apófisis del omóplato.
References in periodicals archive ?
Skeletal elements of the animals present in Jaani graves at Vao bones teeth Furcula Coracoid Vertebrae Cranium Dog 1 10 3 Sheep/goat 1 14 1 Cattle 4 8 2 Pig 2 7 Horse 1 Seal Hare 1 1 Pine marten 1 Fox?
Increased radiodensity and thickness of the descending aorta and a well-circumscribed radiodense pectoral mass between the distal part of the coracoid and the sternum were also observed (Fig 1).
The two heads of the biceps originate from the coracoid (short head) and the supraglenoid tubercle of the humerous (long head), coalescing into a uniform muscle as they traverse the midpoint of the humerus (Figures 11,12A).
The acromion process is completely broken off, but there is a portion of the base of the coracoid process present.
The time of ossification in pectoral girdle and sternum: Scapula, Clavicle, Coracoid, Humerus:
Upper phase NISP duck suzzard eagle sand /kite grouse Coracoid 1 2 1 Scapula 2 1 4 Sternum Humerus 2 Ulna 1 Radius Carpometacarpus Synsacrum Femur Tibiotarsus 1 Tarsometatarsus Phalanges 1 7 All elements 2 4 16 1 Middle phase NISP duck buzzard eagle sand /kite grouse Coracoid 3 13 Scapula 2 5 Sternum 1 Humerus 1 4 14 7 Ulna 1 Radius Carpometacarpus 1 Synsacrum 3 Femur 8 10 Tibiotarsus 3 1 Tarsometatarsus 1 Phalanges 3 All elements 1 19 52 9 Mixed phase NISP buzzard eagle sand /kite grouse Coracoid 1 3 1 Scapula 3 Sternum Humerus 13 Ulna Radius Carpometacarpus Synsacrum Femur 1 3 Tibiotarsus 1 Tarsometatarsus Phalanges All elements 3 22 1 Table 5.
These ligaments are essentially biological pieces of rope, which are wrapped around the coracoid bone in the shoulder and then screwed to the top of the collarbone.
Cinnamond, assistant director of public relations at Tufts, said veterinarians found the bird had injuries to both eyes and a coracoid bone fracture that interfered with flight.
Anterior Shoulder Instability Associated with Coracoid Nonunion in Epileptics
Frontal chest radiograph revealed severe hypoplasia of the body of scapulae bilaterally while the acromion, coracoid and glenoid were well formed.