coracoid

(redirected from coracoids)
Also found in: Medical, Encyclopedia.

cor·a·coid

 (kôr′ə-koid′, kŏr′-)
n.
1. A bony process projecting from the scapula toward the sternum in mammals.
2. A beak-shaped bone articulating with the scapula and sternum in many other vertebrates, such as birds and reptiles.
adj.
Of, relating to, or resembling a coracoid.

[New Latin coracoīdēs, from Greek korakoeidēs, ravenlike : korax, korak-, raven + -oeidēs, -oid.]

coracoid

(ˈkɒrəˌkɔɪd)
n
(Zoology) a paired ventral bone of the pectoral girdle in vertebrates. In mammals it is reduced to a peg (the coracoid process) on the scapula
[C18: from New Latin coracoīdēs, from Greek korakoeidēs like a raven, curved like a raven's beak, from korax raven]

cor•a•coid

(ˈkɔr əˌkɔɪd, ˈkɒr-)

n.
a bony process on the scapula of mammals that extends to the sternum in birds, reptiles, and monotremes.
[1700–10; < New Latin coracoīdēs < Greek korakoeidḗs ravenlike =korak-, s. of kórax raven + -oeidēs -oid]
Translations

cor·a·coid

n. coracoides, apófisis del omóplato.
References in periodicals archive ?
Finally, male coracoids were observed to be longer than females, with males having longer coracoid tip-glenoid distances.
Ljungquist KL, Butler RB, Griesser MJ, Bishop JY Prediction of coracoids thickness using a glenoid width-based model: implications for bone reconstruction procedures in chronic anterior shoulder instability.
Fifteen bones (3 coracoids, 5 humeri, 2 ulnae, carpometacarpus, femur, 3 tibiotarsi) were referred to Podiceps occipitalis rather than to Rollandia rolland because of their much larger size, and rather than to R.
The four specimens (sternum, 2 coracoids, tibiotarsus) agree in size with those of L.
1) Additionally, the coracoids help to suspend the sternum during gliding, which supports the viscera.
The explorers also found cervical vertebrate, coracoids, lower part of scapula, ribs and other bones, Verma added.
This species was based on a nearly complete carpometacarpus and referred ulna and coracoids.
The method of disarticulation is also unusual: the ribs and the ilium appear to have been cut or snapped rather than cleanly chopped, the basal coracoids are only slightly damaged although the sternum is missing, no damage is visible related to the removal of the tibiotarsus from the proximal tarsometatarsus, and single cut-marks are visible on one of the acetabula where the femur was evidently removed.
Vehicle collisions resulted in more damage to the extremities (wing and femur), whereas collisions with windows resulted in trauma to the head, fractures/dislocations of the coracoids and clavicles, and ruptured internal organs.
A small duck is represented by two proximal humeri, two distal coracoids and a carpometacarpus (SBMNH 752).
A coracoid fracture appears to be detrimental to upstroke, preventing the lifting action of m.