cord


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cord

 (kôrd)
n.
1. A slender length of flexible material usually made of twisted strands or fibers and used to bind, tie, connect, or support. See Usage Note at chord1.
2. An insulated flexible electric wire fitted with a plug or plugs.
3. A hangman's rope.
4. An influence, feeling, or force that binds or restrains; a bond or tie.
5. also chord Anatomy A long ropelike structure, such as a nerve or tendon: a spinal cord.
6.
a. A raised rib on the surface of cloth.
b. A fabric or cloth with such ribs.
7. cords Pants made of corduroy.
8. A unit of quantity for cut fuel wood, equal to a stack measuring 4 × 4 × 8 feet or 128 cubic feet (3.62 cubic meters).
tr.v. cord·ed, cord·ing, cords
1. To fasten or bind with a cord: corded the stack of old newspapers and placed them in the recycling bin.
2. To furnish with a cord.
3. To pile (wood) in cords.

[Middle English, from Old French corde, from Latin chorda, from Greek khordē; see gherə- in Indo-European roots.]

cord′er n.

cord

(kɔːd)
n
1. (Textiles) string or thin rope made of several twisted strands
2. (Textiles) a length of woven or twisted strands of silk, etc, sewn on clothing or used as a belt
3. (Textiles) a ribbed fabric, esp corduroy
4. any influence that binds or restrains
5. (Electrical Engineering) US and Canadian a flexible insulated electric cable, used esp to connect appliances to mains. Also called (in Britain and certain other countries): flex
6. (Anatomy) anatomy any part resembling a string or rope: the spinal cord.
7. (Units) a unit of volume for measuring cut wood, equal to 128 cubic feet
vb (tr)
8. to bind or furnish with a cord or cords
9. (Forestry) to stack (wood) in cords
[C13: from Old French corde, from Latin chorda cord, from Greek khordē; see chord1]
ˈcorder n
ˈcordˌlike adj

cord

(kɔrd)

n.
1. a string or thin rope made of several strands braided, twisted, or woven together.
2. a small, flexible, insulated electrical cable.
3. a ribbed fabric, esp. corduroy.
4. a cordlike rib on the surface of cloth.
5. cords, clothing, as trousers, of corded fabric, esp. corduroy.
6. any influence that binds or restrains.
7. a cordlike structure: the spinal cord.
8. a unit of volume used chiefly for fuel wood, now generally equal to 128 cubic feet (3.6 cubic meters), usu. specified as 8 ft. long, 4 ft. wide, and 4 ft. high (2.4 m x 1.2 m x 1.2 m). Abbr.: cd, cd.
v.t.
9. to bind or fasten with a cord or cords.
10. to pile or stack up (wood) in cords.
11. to furnish with a cord.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Anglo-French, Old French corde < Latin chorda < Greek chordḗ gut; confused in part of its history with chord1]
cord′er, n.

cord

- An amount of wood containing 128 cubic feet (4x4x8 feet); the name comes from the old practice of measuring a stack of firewood with a cord of a certain length. To cord is to stack or put up wood in cords.
See also related terms for measuring.

cord

, chord - Cord comes from Greek khorde, "gut, string of a musical instrument," and chord is a refashioning of cord.
See also related terms for musical instrument.

Cord

 a string composed of strands which are woven or twisted together, a central idea or link that strings things together; a measure of cut wood, stone, or rock.
Examples: cords of discipline, 1883; of friendship, 1535; of poorness, 1382; of rock, 1882; of stone, 1703; of wood, 1616.

chord

cord

These words are both pronounced /kɔːd/.

1. 'chord'

A chord is a number of musical notes played or sung together to produce a pleasant sound.

He played some random chords.
2. 'cord'

Cord is strong, thick string. A cord is a piece of this string.

She tied a cord around her box.

A cord is also a length of wire covered with plastic which connects a piece of electrical equipment to an electricity supply.

cord


Past participle: corded
Gerund: cording

Imperative
cord
cord
Present
I cord
you cord
he/she/it cords
we cord
you cord
they cord
Preterite
I corded
you corded
he/she/it corded
we corded
you corded
they corded
Present Continuous
I am cording
you are cording
he/she/it is cording
we are cording
you are cording
they are cording
Present Perfect
I have corded
you have corded
he/she/it has corded
we have corded
you have corded
they have corded
Past Continuous
I was cording
you were cording
he/she/it was cording
we were cording
you were cording
they were cording
Past Perfect
I had corded
you had corded
he/she/it had corded
we had corded
you had corded
they had corded
Future
I will cord
you will cord
he/she/it will cord
we will cord
you will cord
they will cord
Future Perfect
I will have corded
you will have corded
he/she/it will have corded
we will have corded
you will have corded
they will have corded
Future Continuous
I will be cording
you will be cording
he/she/it will be cording
we will be cording
you will be cording
they will be cording
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been cording
you have been cording
he/she/it has been cording
we have been cording
you have been cording
they have been cording
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been cording
you will have been cording
he/she/it will have been cording
we will have been cording
you will have been cording
they will have been cording
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been cording
you had been cording
he/she/it had been cording
we had been cording
you had been cording
they had been cording
Conditional
I would cord
you would cord
he/she/it would cord
we would cord
you would cord
they would cord
Past Conditional
I would have corded
you would have corded
he/she/it would have corded
we would have corded
you would have corded
they would have corded

cord

1. A ceremonial cord made from silk, other natural material or nylon, used by some modern witches.
2. A unit of dry volume, especially used for timber. Equal to 128 ft3.

Cord

1. A measure of volume used primarily to measure the quantity of firewood. Legally, a cord is a stack eight feet long by four feet high by four feet deep. However, a cord was often considered to be a stack eight feet long, four feet high, and as deep as the length of the sticks of firewood, although that is a dictionary definition of a Rick. A Cord-foot is oneeighth cord or a stack four feet high, four feet long, and one foot deep. Often, even if the wood was not intended for sale, it would be initially stacked and measured as it was cut in order to judge when there was enough to last the winter.
2. A front-wheel drive automobile made from 1929–1937 by the Auburn Automobile Company of Auburn, Indiana.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cord - a line made of twisted fibers or threadscord - a line made of twisted fibers or threads; "the bundle was tied with a cord"
agal - a cord (usually of goat's hair) that Arabs (especially Bedouins) wind around their heads to hold down the kaffiyeh
apron string - (usually used in the plural) a cord used to tie an apron at the waist
bowstring - the string of an archer's bow
catgut, gut - a strong cord made from the intestines of sheep and used in surgery
chenille, chenille cord - a soft tufted cord used in embroidery
clews - the cords used to suspend a hammock
clothesline - a cord on which clothes are hung to dry
fishing line - a length of cord to which the leader and float and sinker and hook are attached
lace, lacing - a cord that is drawn through eyelets or around hooks in order to draw together two edges (as of a shoe or garment)
laniard, lanyard - a cord worn around the neck to hold a knife or whistle
laniard, lanyard - a cord with an attached hook that is used to fire certain types of cannon
line - something (as a cord or rope) that is long and thin and flexible; "a washing line"
log line - a knotted cord that runs out from a reel to a piece of wood that is attached to it
piping - a thin strip of covered cord used to edge hems
plumb line, perpendicular - a cord from which a metal weight is suspended pointing directly to the earth's center of gravity; used to determine the vertical from a given point
ripcord - a cord that is pulled to open a parachute from its pack during a descent
ripcord - a cord that is pulled to open the gasbag of a balloon wide enough to release gas and so causes the balloon to descend
sash cord, sash line - a strong cord connecting a sash weight to a sliding sash
slack - a cord or rope or cable that is hanging loosely; "he took up the slack"
static line - a cord used instead of a ripcord to open a parachute; the cord is attached at one end to the aircraft and temporarily attached to the pack of a parachute at the other; it opens the parachute after the jumper is clear of the plane
string, twine - a lightweight cord
string - a tightly stretched cord of wire or gut, which makes sound when plucked, struck, or bowed
thread, yarn - a fine cord of twisted fibers (of cotton or silk or wool or nylon etc.) used in sewing and weaving
tie - a cord (or string or ribbon or wire etc.) with which something is tied; "he needed a tie for the packages"
whipcord - closely twisted hard cord used for the lashes of whips
wick, taper - a loosely woven cord (in a candle or oil lamp) that draws fuel by capillary action up into the flame
wick - any piece of cord that conveys liquid by capillary action; "the physician put a wick in the wound to drain it"
2.cord - a unit of amount of wood cut for burning; 128 cubic feet
3.cord - a light insulated conductor for household usecord - a light insulated conductor for household use
conductor - a device designed to transmit electricity, heat, etc.
extension cord - an electric cord used to extend the length of a power cord
power cord - a cord to conduct power to an electrical appliance
4.cord - a cut pile fabric with vertical ribs; usually made of cotton
Bedford cord - a heavy corded fabric similar to corduroy; used for clothing
cloth, fabric, textile, material - artifact made by weaving or felting or knitting or crocheting natural or synthetic fibers; "the fabric in the curtains was light and semitransparent"; "woven cloth originated in Mesopotamia around 5000 BC"; "she measured off enough material for a dress"
narrow wale - corduroy with narrow ribs
wide wale - corduroy with wide ribs
Verb1.cord - stack in cords; "cord firewood"
pile, stack, heap - arrange in stacks; "heap firewood around the fireplace"; "stack your books up on the shelves"
2.cord - bind or tie with a cord
tie, bind - fasten or secure with a rope, string, or cord; "They tied their victim to the chair"

cord

noun rope, line, string, twine The door had been tied shut with a length of nylon cord.
Translations
الحَبْل الشّوكي، النُّخـاعقَطيفَـه مٌضلَّـعـه، قيطـانكابِل، حَبْل صَغـيـرمَرَسَـه، حَـبْـل
šňůrahlasivkykabelmanšestrmícha
=-båndfløjlledninglinerygsøjle
johtonaru
fonalkordzsinór
mænamjór kaîall; svert snærirafmagnssnúrarifflaî flauel
belaidisbevielislaidassmegenysšpagatas
auklabalss saitesmuguras smadzenessaitevads
cordon
menčesteršpagát
vrv

cord

[kɔːd]
A. N
1. (= thick string) → cuerda f; (for pyjamas, curtains, of window) → cordón m (Elec) → cable m
2. (also umbilical cord) → cordón m umbilical
to cut or sever the cordsoltar amarras
see also spinal, vocal
3. (= material) → pana f cords (= trousers) → pantalones mpl de pana
B. VTatar con cuerdas

cord

[ˈkɔːrd]
n
(= string) → corde f
(= corduroy) → velours m côtelé
(= electric flex) → cordon m (d'alimentation), fil m (électrique)
(also umbilical cord) → cordon m ombilical
modif (= corduroy) [trousers, jacket] → de velours côtelé cords
npl (= trousers) → pantalon m de velours côtelé

cord

n
Schnur f; (for clothes) → Kordel f; (Elec) → Schnur f
cords pl (also a pair of cords)Cordhosen pl
(Tex) = corduroy
attr (Brit) → Cord-; cord jacketCordjacke f; cord trousersCordhosen pl

cord

[kɔːd] n
a. (gen) → corda; (for pyjamas) → cintura; (round parcel) → corda, spago (Elec) → filo
b. (fabric) → velluto a coste cords npl (trousers) → calzoni mpl di velluto a coste

cord

(koːd) noun
1. (a piece of) thin rope or thick string. The burglars tied up the nightwatchman with thick cord.
2. a string-like part of the body. the spinal cord; the vocal cords.
3. a length of electric cable or flex attached to an electrical appliance. the cord of his electric razor.
4. a kind of velvet fabric with a ribbed appearance; (in plural) trousers made of this. a pair of cords.

cord

n. cordón, cuerda, cordel;
spinal ______ espinal;
umbilical ______ umbilical.

cord

n cordón m, cuerda; spinal — médula espinal; umbilical — cordón umbilical; vocal — cuerda vocal
References in classic literature ?
The lid of the left eye twitched; it fell down and snapped up; it was exactly as though the lid of the eye were a window shade and someone stood inside the doctor's head playing with the cord.
The moments glided on, while a feeling of good fellowship passed around the circle like a mystic cord, holding and binding these people together with jest and laughter.
In another moment the twang of the cord was heard, a white streak was seen glancing into the bushes, and the wounded buck plunged from the cover, to the very feet of his hidden enemy.
But these two harpoons, each by its own cord, are both connected with the line; the object being this: to dart them both, if possible, one instantly after the other into the same whale; so that if, in the coming drag, one should draw out, the other may still retain a hold.
The first prize was a most cunning half-grown silver bugle, and mighty pretty, with red silk cord and tassels.
we used to leave the elected lying around loose, and let anybody cord them up and cart them off that wanted to.
They'll loudly talk of Christ's reward, And bind his image with a cord, And scold, and swing the lash abhorred, And sell their brother in the Lord To handcuffed heavenly union.
Adele seemed scarcely to need the warning--she had already retired to a sofa with her treasure, and was busy untying the cord which secured the lid.
I set his plate to keep warm on the fender; and after an hour or two he re-entered, when the room was clear, in no degree calmer: the same unnatural - it was unnatural - appearance of joy under his black brows; the same bloodless hue, and his teeth visible, now and then, in a kind of smile; his frame shivering, not as one shivers with chill or weakness, but as a tight-stretched cord vibrates - a strong thrilling, rather than trembling.
In a recess under it lay some ends of cord, placed there apparently for purposes of packing.
Let even an affectionate Goliath get himself tied to a small tender thing, dreading to hurt it by pulling, and dreading still more to snap the cord, and which of the two, pray, will be master?
Three men pushing at him and three others pulling on a cord about his middle, we dragged him up, staying now and again to show him the bones of those whom he had sent out to kill us, and telling him the tale of that fight.